Shaping The Future Of Healthcare

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Impact of COVID-19 in Hospitals with Alexander Norbash, MD | Christoph Zindel

Season 1, Ep. 1

The current pandemic has made hospitals ground zero across the globe. If we haven’t personally been admitted into hospital by the virus, we can easily imagine scenes of medical staff rushing through crowded corridors, shuffling past one another, concealed head to toe in blue PPE anonymity. At some point over the past three months, this has been the daily reality in every hospital. <br>

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How are hospitals managing during this unprecedented crisis? These are facilities well accustomed to “life or death” situations, but during a pandemic, downtime is a luxury that may never come. Yet, hospitals remain places of business that require management. Particularly in times of crisis, faculty need motivation to push on, and good leadership is more important than ever. University hospitals have the added challenge of overseeing a student population. Today, we’re getting a glimpse of what this crisis has been like from inside one of the top ranked University hospitals in the world. 

Our guest is Alexander Norbash, MD, an Interventional Neuroradiologist from the University of California, San Diego, where he is the Chair and Professor of Radiology, and the Associate Vice Chancellor. There, his focus is on arteriovenous vascular malformations and intracranial aneurysms, and he was among the first clinician-interventionalists to develop and describe the technology of stenting for the carotid and intracranial arteries. Dr. Christoph Zindel is Member of the Managing Board of Siemens Healthineers and holds a Doctor of Medicine M.D.

SOME QUESTIONS WE ASK:

  • How is the current situation affecting you? (3:40)
  • How do you deal with this crisis on the University level? (6:01)
  • Do you have a crisis management process in place for these situations? (10:18)
  • How are you preparing for patients coming back?(16:31)
  • How is the pandemic shaping your research? (22:57)
  • What can healthcare learn from this pandemic? (31:05)

IN THIS EPISODE, YOU WILL LEARN:

  • How people find opportunity during times of crisis (2:23)  
  • How the crisis has affected the University financially (8:12)
  • How to keep people motivated and morale high/ or The Importance of Gratitude (13:31)
  • The biggest current challenge facing this border region (20:44)
  • How diversity and inclusion are being addressed (tele-visits can be an equalizer) (27:13)

Learn more about Alexander Norbash, MD:

UCSD Profile: https://profiles.ucsd.edu/alexander.norbash

Publications: https://www.pubfacts.com/author/Alexander+Norbash

Scholar Citations: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=rQYPnAcAAAAJ&hl=en

Head Injury Institute: http://www.headinjuryinstitute.org/about-us/leadership/alexander-norbash-md-mhcm-facr/

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Season 1, Ep. 14
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Season 1, Ep. 13
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