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Shaping The Future Of Healthcare

A Siemens Healthineers Podcast

Conversations with renowned experts shaping the future of healthcare. Listen for insights on MedTech trends and best practices from leadership, innovators and clinicians around the world.
Latest Episode5/5/2021

How Do Coronavirus Variants Affect our Immune System, and How Can We Protect our Vulnerable?

Season 1, Ep. 12
We’ve come a long way in our understanding of SARS-CoV-2. Since the first cases were reported in late 2019, the rapid spread of the virus required quick thinking, thorough communication across the globe, and immediate action within the medical community. SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly and began mutating differently all over the world. Tracking, testing, and treatment options had to keep pace. We needed information quickly in order to treat people effectively and protect our most vulnerable.Today, Siemens Healthineers President of Laboratory Diagnostics, Deepak Nath is joined by Dr. Ankur Mutreja, a global health scientist from the University of Cambridge, and Dr. Kevin Latinis, a clinical Rheumatologist with a practice in Missouri. Their experiences throughout the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak will help us understand how the virus continues to mutate globally, why viruses mutate, and how early antibody testing helped us to understand the ability of this virus to spread at such an advanced pace.In this episode, you’ll hear about the known variants of SARS-CoV-2, how our immune systems respond through these mutations, and why names matter. We’ll also rewind back to the beginning of the pandemic and hear about some of the earliest serology tests that took place in a Missouri nursing home, and how that timely information helped us understand how the virus spread.Some Questions Asked:What consequences can naming variants after countries or regions have? (2:09)Could a new variant emerge that effectively sets us back to square one? (4:14)How can vaccine development keep pace with these variants? (9:13)Why use antibody tests? (15:18)How can we take care of our most vulnerable? (19:49)What are the next steps for data collection? (22:39)What You’ll Learn in This Episode:Why new variants of the virus continue to be discovered (2:59)Protection levels against new variants from antibodies and the vaccine (4:54)Why mutations occur and when we need to be concerned about them (5:51)What we learned from an early study of antibodies (14:23)How antibody tests work, and what they can tell us (17:30)How one doctor is helping patients feel comfortable with vaccines (21:02)Connect with Ankur Mutreja:LinkedInConnect with Kevin Latinis:LinkedInYoutubeConnect with Katherine Soreng:LinkedInConnect with Deepak Nath:LinkedInTwitter
5/5/2021

How Do Coronavirus Variants Affect our Immune System, and How Can We Protect our Vulnerable?

Season 1, Ep. 12
We’ve come a long way in our understanding of SARS-CoV-2. Since the first cases were reported in late 2019, the rapid spread of the virus required quick thinking, thorough communication across the globe, and immediate action within the medical community. SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly and began mutating differently all over the world. Tracking, testing, and treatment options had to keep pace. We needed information quickly in order to treat people effectively and protect our most vulnerable.Today, Siemens Healthineers President of Laboratory Diagnostics, Deepak Nath is joined by Dr. Ankur Mutreja, a global health scientist from the University of Cambridge, and Dr. Kevin Latinis, a clinical Rheumatologist with a practice in Missouri. Their experiences throughout the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak will help us understand how the virus continues to mutate globally, why viruses mutate, and how early antibody testing helped us to understand the ability of this virus to spread at such an advanced pace.In this episode, you’ll hear about the known variants of SARS-CoV-2, how our immune systems respond through these mutations, and why names matter. We’ll also rewind back to the beginning of the pandemic and hear about some of the earliest serology tests that took place in a Missouri nursing home, and how that timely information helped us understand how the virus spread.Some Questions Asked:What consequences can naming variants after countries or regions have? (2:09)Could a new variant emerge that effectively sets us back to square one? (4:14)How can vaccine development keep pace with these variants? (9:13)Why use antibody tests? (15:18)How can we take care of our most vulnerable? (19:49)What are the next steps for data collection? (22:39)What You’ll Learn in This Episode:Why new variants of the virus continue to be discovered (2:59)Protection levels against new variants from antibodies and the vaccine (4:54)Why mutations occur and when we need to be concerned about them (5:51)What we learned from an early study of antibodies (14:23)How antibody tests work, and what they can tell us (17:30)How one doctor is helping patients feel comfortable with vaccines (21:02)Connect with Ankur Mutreja:LinkedInConnect with Kevin Latinis:LinkedInYoutubeConnect with Katherine Soreng:LinkedInConnect with Deepak Nath:LinkedInTwitter
4/14/2021

Prioritizing Diversity and Inclusion for a Better Workplace with Prof. Dr. Ulrike Attenberger| Christoph Zindel

Season 1, Ep. 11
Diversity and inclusion are big topics in business today. While it’s something many organizations are striving for, it’s not always understood on a statistical or emotional level. When employees don’t feel as though they’re part of the team, the consequences can mount up to something much bigger. Feeling “apart” takes a toll on not only performance, but also the health of the employee. Likewise, a lack of diversity means a lack of varied experience. This can hold the whole team back, and foster a lack of understanding.Healthcare bears a unique responsibility when it comes to fostering an environment of comfort and consideration. Understanding the needs of patients is much more than tending to wounds and performing surgeries. At its core, it’s about empathy. When empathy and understanding exist within the work environment, only then can they effectively translate to the realm of care.In this episode, Managing Board Member Christoph Zindel interviews Prof. Dr. Ulrike Attenberger. Professor Attenberger is Director of the Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology at Bonn University Hospital in Germany, and a member of the Diversity @ DRG Commission. Her interest in gender diversity led to her contribution to a 2018 special report entitled “Women in radiology: gender diversity is not a metric—it is a tool for excellence”, published by European Radiology.In today’s conversation, you’ll hear about the positive influence of a diverse workforce within the healthcare sector. Professor Attenberger believes that diversity allows us to embrace dimensionality, and shares how this reflects positively in the workplace. She also reveals the ways in which inclusivity can be achieved through organizational reforms, and how it has the capacity to benefit physicians as well as patients.Some Questions Asked:What is diversity and inclusion for you? (2:15)How should physicians take diversity into account in their work and training? (10:46)What can be done to increase the representation of women in leadership? (15:22)How do you foster inclusion at the University Hospital in Bonn, and in medicine as a whole? (22:38)What You’ll Learn in This Episode:The dangers of homogeneous healthcare (4:49)The most important aspect of building a successful team (7:35)What we know about unconscious bias (13:23)Ideas about how we can close the gap on gender-based career obstacles (19:25)Connect with Ulrike Attenberger:University Hospital BonnConnect with our Managing Board Member, Christoph Zindel:LinkedIn
3/24/2021

Understanding Immunity: How Antibody Testing for SARS-CoV-2 Works and What We Can Learn from it with Dr. Angela Rasmussen and the Mizzou Antibody Testing Team | Deepak Nath

Season 1, Ep. 10
It’s just over one year since COVID-19 became a familiar term around the world. Due to quick action and collaborative innovation from science and medicine, vaccines have been developed and are being distributed at a pace unrivaled in human history. But, the work doesn’t stop there.Regularly monitoring vaccine efficacy and surveying human behavior among the vaccinated population are crucial to understanding its durability. Antibody testing will continue to be important, long after vaccines have been administered.Our guest today is Dr. Angela Rasmussen, a virologist and affiliate of the Georgetown Center for Global Health, Science and Security. She collects evidence about the human response to emerging viruses to gain a better understanding of vaccine efficacy.Today we’re discussing all aspects of antibody testing for SARS-CoV-2. We’ll learn how the tests are implemented, how they determine an immune response is present, and why testing for antibodies is such an important part of the battle against this virus.We’ll also hear from University of Missouri (MU) scientists Dr. Mark Daniels, Professor of Immunology, Dr. John R. Middleton, Professor of Livestock Health, and Dr. Enid Schatz, chair of the Department of Public Health. The university is conducting an antibody testing study – both biological and behavioral – and our experts on the ground at MU will walk us through the antibody testing process from start to finish.Some Questions Asked:How can testing help us continue to research and improve vaccine use alongside their distribution? (2:42)What does an ideal testing scenario look like? (4:21)Which behaviors can be more easily changed, and which might be more challenging to shift? (12:13)When do you think people can expect to return to business as usual? (16:19)What You’ll Learn in This Episode:Why it’s hard to determine post-vaccination behavior recommendations (1:30)The importance of following the progress of vaccinated individuals (3:26)How antibody testing works at the University of Missouri (6:56)What we can learn from collecting behavioral data (10:27)Discoveries that were made about antibody levels (13:58)Why it’s important to invest in research now (18:51)Learn more about Dr. Angela Rasmussen:WebsiteTwitterLearn more about Dr. Mark DanielsMU School of MedicineLinkedInLearn more about Dr. John R. MiddletonMU College of Veterinary MedicineLearn more about Dr. Enid Schatz:MU School of Health ProfessionsLinkedInConnect with President of Laboratory Diagnostics, Deepak Nath:LinkedInTwitter
1/26/2021

The Future of Robotics in Healthcare with Dr. Tejas Patel, MD, DM, FACC, FESC, FSCAI, FCSI | Christoph Zindel

Season 1, Ep. 9
When we think of robots being used in surgical procedures, the concept may seem futuristic. But in reality, this type of technology has been in place for a number of years, especially in operating rooms occupied by doctors who have been personally interested in exploring the possibilities and benefits of robotic assistance.Today’s guest is considered to be a pioneer in utilizing robotic technology in his practice. It was first utilized in his hospital in Gujarat, India back in 2017, and by 2018, he had made international headlines after performing the world's first in-human robotic heart surgery.In this episode, Managing Board Member Christoph Zindel interviews Tejas Patel, Chairman & Chief Interventional Cardiologist at Apex Heart Institute in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. Dr. Patel is internationally recognized as one of the world’s pioneers in the field of Transradial Approach, and he is a long-time advocate for the use of robotics in the field of healthcare.Through the challenging times of the COVID-19 pandemic, robotic technology has provided a safety advantage for healthcare professionals, allowing them to perform surgical procedures without risking exposure.Today, you’ll learn about the many advantages of using robotics in healthcare, how the issue of cybersecurity is being addressed, and you’ll gain an understanding of how remote surgery is performed along with the long-term potential for this technology.Some Questions Asked:How is robot assisted therapy currently being used? (3:10)How does this technology affect the personnel requirements on site? (10:35)In which areas do you expect to see the extended use of robotics? (22:00)How do you stay healthy during a pandemic? (25:23)What You’ll Learn in This Episode:The advantage of robotics during a pandemic (5:56)Defining artificial intelligence (13:44)The challenges related to cybersecurity (15:32)The connectivity required to perform surgery remotely (19:42)Connect with Dr. Tejas Patel:LinkedInConnect with our Managing Board Member, Christoph Zindel:LinkedIn
12/6/2020

How Finland is Leading the Digital Healthcare Revolution with Päivi Sillanaukee, MD, PhD, eMBA | Christoph Zindel

Season 1, Ep. 8
Every country is unique in its healthcare operations. Much of Europe has a long history of socialized medicine based on The Bismark Model, a German system dating back to 1883 which guarantees healthcare to its citizens. Programs in Europe and Asia are primarily adaptations of this model.By the 1960s, however, Finland saw the need to rethink its healthcare system and create something that served its population better. A young group of doctors who were also in charge of policymaking took the lead in creating a new model. In 1972, the current Finnish healthcare system was signed into law, making public health centers the central concept.In this episode, Managing Board Member Christoph Zindel interviews Dr. Päivi Sillanaukee, Director-General at the Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. Dr. Päivi Sillanaukee is the thematic Ambassador for Health and Wellbeing at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland as part of a pilot program of cross-sectoral cooperation on global issues. She also represents Finland on the World Health Organization’s Executive Board.We’ll learn how the healthcare model in Finland operates, the infrastructure it requires, and how this model actually encouraged digital innovation from its inception. We’ll also discover the lessons that can be extracted from this model that has been serving the Finnish population for nearly half a century.Some Questions Asked:What can we learn from the system of healthcare in Finland? (2:30)How do you view the scalability of your system? (6:00)How can access to care be improved? (9:20)What conditions do policymakers need to create for digitization? (21:37)What advantages come from diversity in healthcare? (29:51)How do you stay healthy during the long winter months in Finland? (37:59)What You’ll Learn in This Episode:The role of socialized healthcare in Finland (3:39)How Finland built the infrastructure for digitalization (10:59)Two things you need in order to have digital innovation in healthcare (14:48)Why trust in technology among populations is so important (17:36)How culture plays a role in keeping us healthy (39:13)Connect with Dr. Päivi Sillanaukee:LinkedInTwitterConnect with our Managing Board Member, Christoph Zindel:LinkedIn
10/28/2020

A Visionary for Change: Ophthalmology and Accessibility with Aravind Srinivasan MS, MBA | Christoph Zindel

Season 1, Ep. 7
Over half of the world's population lacks access to basic healthcare. Beginning to tackle this problem requires more than structural change in the way we provide care. A true sense of purpose to create and direct those changes is vital for the structural DNA of a healthcare system to be rewired.Blindness was once a major problem for people all across India. The issue was accessibility to care in the early stages of ophthalmological complications. In 1976, Dr. Govindappa Venkataswamy opened the first Aravind Eye Hospital. The goal was to streamline care and make it more affordable while keeping the quality of care at a premium. Since its founding, the Aravind Eye Care System has expanded, serving more than 55 million patients across India. That legacy continues under the leadership of today’s guest.In this episode, Managing Board Member Christoph Zindel interviews Dr. Aravind Srinivasan, Chief Medical Officer at Aravind Eye Hospital Chennai. He is a cataract surgeon and expert in ophthalmology at Aravind Eye Care System. His focus is on management, innovation, and mentoring, specializing in evaluating and interpreting the performance of each division of AECS.Dr. Aravind Srinivasan shares the organizational mission, being that if treatment exists, then there’s no reason for people to suffer blindness needlessly. Through streamlining and standardizing their process of care, Aravind Eye Care System has helped countless people gain access to treatment. Today we’ll hear about the personal motivation that led to building the system, how it’s applied across India, and what it takes in terms of experience and personal drive in order to manage such a revolutionary system of healthcare.Some Questions I Ask:Can you explain your system of healthcare? (3:36)How are you able to make care so affordable? (9:20)How have you increased accessibility to care in India? (13:21)Is telehealth contributing to accessibility during the Covid-19 pandemic? (17:55)What can other healthcare organizations learn from your model? (20:00)How do diversity and inclusion play a role in the building of your teams? (24:20)What You’ll Learn in This Episode:How the problem of accessibility was addressed (4:35)Why a sense of purpose often gets lost in the business of healthcare (7:50)How poverty created a cultural barrier to asking for care (13:50)A simple example of streamlining that helped shape AECS (20:22)Connect with Aravind Srinivasan MS, MBA:FacebookAravind Eye Care SystemConnect with our Managing Board Member, Christoph Zindel:LinkedIn
10/12/2020

Pandemics, Globalization, and How To Improve Healthcare through Innovation and Digitalization with Noel Yeo, MD | Christoph Zindel

Season 1, Ep. 6
In an increasingly globalized world, viral spread has been difficult to avoid. Large numbers of people are moving constantly from place to place for business and leisure, and as economic prosperity grows, movement follows suit. While we can’t prevent pandemics from happening, we can learn how to manage them better. With experience comes innovation.Today, Managing Board Member Christoph Zindel interviews Dr. Noel Yeo, the Senior Vice President of one of Asia’s largest integrated private healthcare groups, Parkway Hospitals in Singapore at Parkway Pantai. Dr. Yeo has an Executive Master of Business Administration, a Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Law and Ethics, and an Executive Diploma in Directorship. He has been leading the group as their hospital facilities have battled the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak.In this episode, Dr. Yeo tells us what it’s been like working through the COVID-19 pandemic at his hospital in Singapore. Having dealt with the SARS-CoV-1 outbreak back in 2003, Dr. Yeo provides valuable insights from that experience. We’ll talk about what he’s learned, how hospitals can prepare for future outbreaks, and the innovations that have resulted from these experiences. Dr. Yeo also talks about the importance of digitalization, and why a more patient-centric model of healthcare that leans towards prevention is the way of the future.Some Questions Asked:Having experienced another outbreak in 2003, was Singapore better prepared than other countries? (1:53)Are applications being used in Singapore to help with contact tracing? (7:27)How has the backlog of elective procedures been dealt with in Singapore? (16:50)How do you prepare for the next pandemic? (20:13)Do you expect the beds and resources used to remain beyond this pandemic waiting for the next one? (25:22)How are standard operating procedures dealt with, in such a large network? (29:53)What You’ll Learn in This Episode:The 3 point strategy used to confront SARS-CoV-2 (4:26)How SARS-CoV-2 spread among the population in Singapore (15:07)Plans for mass testing when the next wave hits (21:16)Predictions about future healthcare challenges in Asia and beyond (33:26)How we can use the abundance of data in healthcare to our advantage (37:22)One helpful innovation that is being used at Parkway Pantai (39:00)Connect with Dr. Noel Yeo:LinkedInInstagramConnect with our Managing Board Member, Christoph Zindel:LinkedIn