Oeuvre Busters

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Talking about early Kurosawa and Mifune!

Season 4, Ep. 2

On this dialectically-enhanced episode of Oeuvre Busters, Liam and George discuss two films for the price of one: Sanshiro Sugata (1943), directed by Akira Kurosawa, and Snow Trail (1947), starring Toshiro Mifune. Topics discussed on this episode: alpha and beta males; Babar, the colonialist; the shit and the mire; middle-brow literature. Plus, my god, that sandal! So quintessentially Kurosawa.


Topics not discussed: anemones.


Hey, you all know we love you out there, right? But do you love us? If so, please consider subscribing to our new Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/oeuvrebusters For only $3 dollars a month, you’ll get a bonus episode and a essay from George about the films being discussed on the podcast. (George promises no problematic manifestos about the current state of the world.) Also, we will definitely give you a shout out on the podcast! Your financial support will also help us upgrade our equipment and improve the show in a variety of ways.


Please, if you can, rate, review, and subscribe to Oeuvre Busters on Stitcher and iTunes and wherever else you might download your favorite podcasts. Your ratings and reviews help the show reach a wider audience. Please also feel free to send us regular and hate mail at: Oeuvrebusters@gmail.com. Again, we appreciate all the support.  


"Robobozo" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

More Episodes

8/5/2020

Talking about Drunken Angel with Stuart Galbraith IV!

Season 4, Ep. 3
On this angelic episode of Oeuvre Busters, Liam and George welcome Stuart Galbraith IV, the man who literally wrote the book on the Kurosawa/Mifune relationship, The Emperor and the Wolf. Topics discussed: cynicism and hopefulness; curmudgeonly doctors; Yakuza feudalism; spiritual sickness. Also, Clint Eastwood is just a watered down version of Mifune, really.Topics not discussed: How Vladimir Nabokov’s translation of Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin lead to the ending of his friendship with Edmund Wilson.Stuart Galbraith IV is a Kyoto-based film historian, writer, and publisher-editor of World Cinema Paradise. He is the author of seven books, including The Emperor and the Wolf (Faber & Faber, 2002), the joint-biography of Akira Kurosawa and Toshiro Mifune hailed by Martin Scorsese as "a must read." Within the home video field, Galbraith has written essays for Criterion's three-disc Seven Samurai DVD and Blu-ray, Optimum's Rashomon, BCI Eclipse's The Quiet Duel and Subkultur's The Long Good Friday. In 2015, Galbraith recorded an audio commentary and wrote and produced a new short documentary, Rashomon at 65, for the British Film Institute's Blu-ray of Kurosawa's 1950 classic. Concurrently, he served as an consultant on Oscar-winning director Steven Okazaki's documentary feature, Mifune - Last Samurai (2015). Holding a Master's Degree from the University of Southern California's prestigious School of Cinema-Television, Galbraith worked as an archivist and researcher at both Warner Bros. and M-G-M. At Warner Bros., Galbraith implemented preservation projects and procedures at both its USC-Warner Bros. Archives and the Warner Bros. Corporate Image Archives. At M-G-M, Galbraith worked as a "film detective," tracking down the original camera negatives to more than three dozen "lost" films. Since 2003 he has lived in Kyoto, Japan with his wife, Yukiyo, and their daughter, Sadie. He is currently at work on a new act of preservation, which he’ll tell us all about.Hey, you all know we love you out there, right? But do you love us? If so, please consider subscribing to our new Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/oeuvrebusters For only $3 dollars a month, you’ll get a bonus episode and a essay from George (the first one drops August 17th!) about the films being discussed on the podcast. (George promises no problematic manifestos about the current state of the world.) Also, we will definitely give you a shout out on the podcast! Your financial support will also help us upgrade our equipment and improve the show in a variety of ways.Please, if you can, rate, review, and subscribe to Oeuvre Busters on Stitcher and iTunes and wherever else you might download your favorite podcasts. Your ratings and reviews help the show reach a wider audience. Please also feel free to send us regular and hate mail at: Oeuvrebusters@gmail.com. Again, we appreciate all the support."Robobozo" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
7/15/2020

RE-RELEASE: Cassavetes and Company on the Dick Cavett Show

*Note:To celebrate HUSBANDS being available on the Criterion Channel, we’re re-releasing all of our HUSBANDS content. Believe it or not, this show started because of HUSBANDS.The Dick Cavett episode is available below, as well as on the Criterion Channel. Watch, listen, and cringe!*Welcome to this bonus episode (you're welcome, America!) of Oeuvre Busters! On September 18, 1970, Cassavetes, Ben Gazzara, and Peter Falk appeared on the Dick Cavett Show to promote Husbands. The recording was, to say the least, rather eventful, what with Cassavetes, Gazzara and Falk more interested in ragin' on stage than in answering Cavett's questions. The encounter needs to be seen to be believed! To commemorate this shitshow, and to further our discussion of Husbands, Liam and George have recorded an audio commentary to accompany the show. Topics covered: How drunk are these guys really? Who does the better pratfall, Cassavetes or Gazzara? Also, feet, feet and more feet! (Links below to the show itself and to Cavett reminiscing about the experience in The New Yorker.) Topics not covered: The serious plot hole in Love Actually (2003): how the hell does that annoyingly precocious kid both learn to play the drums in the span of a week AND find himself playing in the school pageant? We don't even see him try out for the band! Who's running this pageant?! It doesn't make any sense, and the movie, otherwise a masterpiece, suffers greatly for it.YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UZ6IOJ5ovwDick Cavett's Worst show: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/dick-cavetts-worst-show