The Grindstone

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Lacey Davidson: Philosophy in Service of Lives Less Free

Season 2, Ep. 1

To kick off the long-awaited second season of The Grindstone, we welcome to the studios Dr. Lacey Davidson, who graduated with her PhD from Purdue just this past summer! Dr. Davidson is now a Visiting Assistant Professor at California Lutheran University.


In this episode, we discuss how one of her first philosophy courses challenged her worldview, critical philosophy and philosophy born of struggle, her work with the organization Springfield Promise Neighborhood (Springfield, OH), community organization and effective strategies, the influence community organization and activism has on her philosophical research program, entity type pluralism as a way through the individualist-structuralist debate in philosophies of racism, Dr. Leonard Harris' actuarial account of 'necrobeing', and her research on implicit bias. Many of the ways Lacey talks about community organizing and the power of people comes from the collectively developed epistemic resources of the Younger Womxn's Task Force of Greater Lafayette. You can read Dr. Davidson's recent article, "When Testimony Isn’t Enough: Implicit Bias Research as Epistemic Exclusion," in Overcoming Epistemic Injustice: Social and Psychological Perspectives (eds. Sherman and Goguen, Rowman & Littlefield, 2019).


We also launch the Sally Scholz fan club. Enjoy!

More Episodes

3/20/2020

Carl Huffman Lecture: Pythagorean Ethics in the Time of Plato

Season 3, Ep. 3
This episode of The Grindstone features the lecture given by Carl Huffman (DePauw University) at Purdue University on Saturday, 27 April 2019. The lecture was given at a conference honoring the career of Dr. Patricia Curd, Professor Emerita of the Department of Philosophy at Purdue.The title of the lecture is: "Pythagorean Ethics in the Time of Plato".Dr. Huffman's abstract of the talk is below:In this talk I first argue that the Pythagoreans whose way of life Plato notes in Book Ten of the Republic are the Pythagoreans whose ethical system Aristoxenus described in his Pythagorean Precepts. The rest of the talk is devoted to an overview of the ethical system found in the fragments of the Pythagorean Precepts and a brief discussion of that system's place in the history of Greek ethics. The ethical system of the Pythagorean Precepts is based on a peculiarly Pythagorean understanding of human beings as by nature insolent and excessive. In the natural state human beings live shameless and incoherent lives from which they must be saved by supervision, which imposes restraint upon them. I examine the Pythagorean treatment of the following topics in light of these general principles: the proper goals for human action, desire, diet, sex, procreation, friendship and luck. Study of these topics shows that the Precepts are best understood as a parallel development to the ethics of Democritus and Socrates. The Precepts emphasize expertise and appeal to authority figures rather than just to the best argument, which is not surprising in Pythagoreanism, which is ultimately based on the authority of the master, Pythagoras.NOTE TO LISTENER: Due to technical difficulties with the wireless mic during this talk, portions of the audio drop out for a few seconds here and there. In an effort to keep the flow of the talk in tact, we did not edit these portions out. The longest drop lasts for about 15-20 seconds, but in total less than 2 minutes of the 50 minute talk have been lost. We apologize to Dr. Huffman and our listeners for this.
3/13/2020

Vanessa de Harven Lecture: Plato, The Last Presocratic

Season 3, Ep. 2
This episode of The Grindstone features the lecture given by Vanessa de Harven (UMass-Amherst) at Purdue University on Saturday, 27 April 2019. The lecture was given at a conference honoring the career of Dr. Patricia Curd, Professor Emerita of the Department of Philosophy at Purdue.The title of the lecture is: "Plato, The Last Presocratic: Remarks on Republic V in honor of Pat Curd".Dr. de Harven's overview of the talk is below:The end of Republic V is a locus classicus for the characterization of Plato as an impossible realist so committed to Forms that he forgoes all knowledge of the sensible world. I argue that one can stand by a so-called objects analysis of the argument directed to the lovers of sights and sounds, which sets knowledge and opinion over different objects, without precluding knowledge of the sensible world. The mistake engrained in the tradition is the idea that sensible particulars themselves (say, Helen or a vase) are the objects of opinion, as opposed to sensible particulars considered only in terms of their sensible properties (e.g. their shapes and colors). Setting knowledge over the Forms and opinion over sensibles is thus not a move to another world or to mere Form-gazing, but a change in perspective on this one world. Indeed, Socrates’ underappreciated analogy with dreaming and waking tells us as much, and I show it is of a piece with the argument that follows.