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NSI Live

Each year, NSI hosts dozens of events in person and online with policymakers, business leaders, and experts focused on the hardest national security questions facing America and its allies. Along with NSI's events, this
Latest Episode10/20/2021

Tech 2020/21: Allies, Enemies, and the Homefront Part 3: The National Security Implications of Antitrust

On Tuesday, October 19, 2021, as part of NSI’sTech Innovation and American National Security project, NSI hosted the third panel of a four-part series examining the national security implications of antitrust challenges at home and abroad.This third event took a look at how U.S. adversaries are addressing antitrust questions related to the tech industry as well as the implications of such efforts for our national security. Our panel features Maureen Ohlhausen, Matt Perault, and Alex Petros, and was moderated by NSI Founder and Executive Director, Jamil N. Jaffer.Adversarial nation-state governments, such as China’s, are known to bolster their own economy through government financing of certain private sector industries, including companies in the tech industry, in order to effectuate national goals, including national security related goals. In particular, while China has encouraged rapid growth in its domestic tech sector in a bid to challenge its biggest economic competitor—the United States—it has at times, placed a heavy regulatory hand on both foreign and domestic tech companies, including using the levers of antitrust policy at home. China’s antitrust challenges are seen by many to have little to do with protecting competition; rather, Beijing’s antitrust and other policies appear to punish companies and executives that don’t adhere to the party line. This panel will look at the ways in which China and other adversarial nations both encourage and discourage foreign and domestic tech competition and how such nations choose its antitrust targets.
10/20/2021

Tech 2020/21: Allies, Enemies, and the Homefront Part 3: The National Security Implications of Antitrust

On Tuesday, October 19, 2021, as part of NSI’sTech Innovation and American National Security project, NSI hosted the third panel of a four-part series examining the national security implications of antitrust challenges at home and abroad.This third event took a look at how U.S. adversaries are addressing antitrust questions related to the tech industry as well as the implications of such efforts for our national security. Our panel features Maureen Ohlhausen, Matt Perault, and Alex Petros, and was moderated by NSI Founder and Executive Director, Jamil N. Jaffer.Adversarial nation-state governments, such as China’s, are known to bolster their own economy through government financing of certain private sector industries, including companies in the tech industry, in order to effectuate national goals, including national security related goals. In particular, while China has encouraged rapid growth in its domestic tech sector in a bid to challenge its biggest economic competitor—the United States—it has at times, placed a heavy regulatory hand on both foreign and domestic tech companies, including using the levers of antitrust policy at home. China’s antitrust challenges are seen by many to have little to do with protecting competition; rather, Beijing’s antitrust and other policies appear to punish companies and executives that don’t adhere to the party line. This panel will look at the ways in which China and other adversarial nations both encourage and discourage foreign and domestic tech competition and how such nations choose its antitrust targets.
9/23/2021

Tech 2020/21: Allies, Enemies, and the Homefront Part 2: The National Security Implications of Antitrust

OnThursday,September 23, from12:30 – 1:30 PM ET, as part of NSI’sTech Innovation and American National Security project, NSI hosted the second panel of a four-part series examining the national security implications of antitrust challenges at home and abroad.This second event took a look at how U.S.-allied governments are addressing antitrust questions related to the tech industry as well as the implications of such efforts for American and allied national security.Our panel features Dr. Roslyn Layton, Professor Jan Rybnicek, and Dr. Hal Singer, and was moderated by NSI Founder and Executive Director, Jamil N. Jaffer.European governments, including Germany, the United Kingdom, France, and Ireland, are increasingly raising antitrust challenges against U.S. tech companies causing friction between our nations and potentially undermining our collective national security posture, particularly relative to key nation-state competitors like China. This event examined how European nation-states, in exercising their own regulatory authorities to regulate, dissolve, and monitor companies, are moving forward with laws targeting American companies, as well as how these new regulations potentially impact these companies as well as their impact on American and allied national security. The panel also explored the critical role that U.S. and U.S. allied joint bodies, as well as tech industry, can play in promoting a democratic value-based global digital ecosystem to counter digital authoritarianism and the importance for allied national security of maintaining relative unity amongst the allies on innovation policy.