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Limitless Africa

Does aid create more problems than it solves?

Season 1, Ep. 13

As a region, Africa accounts for around 20% of US aid. In fact, development projects throughout the continent depend on this money.


But some argue that there is little evidence that aid produces economic growth. Instead they say aid encourages a culture of dependency and corruption. 


This week on #LimitlessAfrica we ask an aid worker, an activist and an economist: Does aid create more problems than it solves?


Mutemi Wa Kiama an activist from Nairobi, Kenya  known for campaigning against aid in the shape of international loans - he was even imprisoned for it. He thinks aid loans create spiralling debt which only benefits those in power. 


Pedro Matos has worked for the World Food Programme in Africa and Asia for over a decade, and has a slightly different point of view. Matos was part of the team which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2020. He now works in Sudan, delivering food and assistance to over six million people.


Albert Honlonkou is the Director of the National University of Applied Economics and Management in Benin. He argues aid creates a culture of dependency,

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