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Get A Better Broadcast, Podcast and Voice-Over Voice

Short, daily professional voice advice from breathing to conversational reading: specifically for presenters on radio and TV, podcasts, YouTube, commercial voice-overs, ebook and elearning narrators.

Year Two of short daily episodes to improve the quality of your speaking voice.Through these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection and pro
Latest Episode5/18/2022

0504 – A Giveaway That You’re Reading

Season 2, Ep. 504
2022.05.19 – 0504 – A Giveaway That You’re ReadingA Giveaway That You’re ReadingSometimes it’s obvious you’re reading something because it contains too much information that you couldn’t possibly know or remember. As an example, here is something that if read as written will definitely sound as if it is being read:“On Thursday July 7th 2005, three bomb explosions hit London Underground trains…”The reason it sounds as if it’s being read is because few people would remember what day of the week it was, so clearly the information is in front of you. If you want to come across powerfully, you have to engage in a little play-acting and say something like this:“July the 7th 2005 … I remember it was a Thursday …” There’s only one occasion when you should sound as if you’re clearly reading something; and that’s when you are quoting someone, in which case you should say exactly that: ‘…and I quote…’Ironically, reading something flawlessly doesn’t sound impressive when you’re trying to make out you’re adlibbing. It sounds cold and matter-of-fact. If you throw in the occasional hesitation, gentle emphasis and change the pace of your presentation, it’ll sound like you’re thinking about it, as if it’s something honestly important to you. This will have more intellectual and emotional impact, which is what you want, if you want your listener to think you’re smart.
5/18/2022

0504 – A Giveaway That You’re Reading

Season 2, Ep. 504
2022.05.19 – 0504 – A Giveaway That You’re ReadingA Giveaway That You’re ReadingSometimes it’s obvious you’re reading something because it contains too much information that you couldn’t possibly know or remember. As an example, here is something that if read as written will definitely sound as if it is being read:“On Thursday July 7th 2005, three bomb explosions hit London Underground trains…”The reason it sounds as if it’s being read is because few people would remember what day of the week it was, so clearly the information is in front of you. If you want to come across powerfully, you have to engage in a little play-acting and say something like this:“July the 7th 2005 … I remember it was a Thursday …” There’s only one occasion when you should sound as if you’re clearly reading something; and that’s when you are quoting someone, in which case you should say exactly that: ‘…and I quote…’Ironically, reading something flawlessly doesn’t sound impressive when you’re trying to make out you’re adlibbing. It sounds cold and matter-of-fact. If you throw in the occasional hesitation, gentle emphasis and change the pace of your presentation, it’ll sound like you’re thinking about it, as if it’s something honestly important to you. This will have more intellectual and emotional impact, which is what you want, if you want your listener to think you’re smart.
5/14/2022

0500 – The Anchor/Reporter Rapport

Season 2, Ep. 500
2022.05.15 – 0500 – The Anchor/Reporter RapportStructureYou are a reporter and so you need to be able to succinctly communicate the distinct points that ‘make the story the story’, boiling down the issue or the scene to what’s important. If you get stuck in the weeds of detail, you could end up the creek without a paddle. What is the main story here? What are the elements that took us from where we were to where we are, what order should they logically go in, and how do you explain them to someone who may not have been following every twist and turn as you, the reporter, has?A cliched format of scripting these two-ways has the presenter asking the reporter questions such as:·What do we know so far?·What does today’s news mean?·What reaction has there been?·What happens next?But these provide answers that the host would know already – and so asking them sounds false, misleading and patronising to the audience – and inevitably, unconversational. Instead, the anchor and reporter need to have a rapport to make it sound more natural:·“OK in this question I’ve written for you to ask me, just so you know, when you get half way through I’m going to politely interrupt you and agree with what you’re asking”. ·Get the host to give some of the information rather than the reporter. That way they are more involved and look more knowledgeable on a story that as an anchor frankly they ‘should’ know about: “We covered the warehouse fire on the show yesterday, remind us what happened…”. No! It’s the host’s show, they were on yesterday, they remember what the story was, so rephrase the question to make it sound more natural. And if the question is natural, the answer and the voice will sound more natural too.
5/12/2022

0498 – TV Two-ways

Season 2, Ep. 498
2022.05.13 – 0498 – TV Two-ways VOICE BOXTV Two-ways A two-way is when a studio presenter on radio or t,v interviews a reporter colleague (usually one who is on location, but maybe in the studio) about a story. The reporter:·Is not working to a script·Has to sound fluent and confident·Must get over the main points in a succinct and accurate way·Should be able to cope with any question asked of them from the host·Can react to anything that happens while they are on air. ·Must be prepared to go ‘open ended’ – that is to talk to a certainduration (say 30 seconds or a minute) with the possibility that they are cut short (a minutes’ worth of material now has to be cut down to 15 seconds), or go long (stretching that 30 seconds prepped work to 90 seconds), or ‘go open ended’ when the anchor and reporter will talk to fill the available time until, say the start of a live news conference or the President arrives, or the verdict is announced.Much of this is easier for radio reporters as they are not on screen and so can refer to notes rather than having to reply on their wits and their memory, but it can be quite daunting.Very often the questions and answers can be scripted – and sound as though they are: stilted, awkward and obviously written and read to a format.And yet they should be:·Conversational ·Have a clear structure and ‘journey’ – perhaps with background, what the latest is, what it means to people with examples or case studies, reaction, what happens next