Get A Better Broadcast, Podcast and Video Voice

12/3/2021

0337 – Projection Advice to BBC Presenters

Season 1, Ep. 337
2021.12.03 – 0337 – Projection Advice to BBC Presenters On 2nd January 1928, 5XX (the forerunner of the BBC) broadcast its first ‘Daily Service’ from Savoy Hill in London, with The Rev H.R.L Sheppard C.H., D.D. A booklet “Hints For Preachers” was published for those who would be speaking on this new medium and were unsure how to ‘use it’. The advice:“Remember that your vast audience isn't a crowd or congregation,but various individuals to whom you are speaking in the intimacy of their homes.”Audio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter StewartThrough these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection and projection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a career spent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode!And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTER BROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE.Look out for more details of the book during 2022.Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_StewartPeter has been around voice and audio all his working life and has trained hundreds of broadcasters in all styles of radio from pop music stations such as Capital FM and BBC Radio 1, the classical music station BBC Radio 3 and regional BBC stations. He’s trained news presenters on regional TV, the BBC News Channel and on flagship programmes such as the BBC’s Panorama.He has written a number of books on audio and video presentation and production (see contacts clink above) and presented hundreds of radio shows (you may have heard him on BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 4, Virgin Radio or Kiss, as well as BBC regional radio) with various formats. He has read tens of thousands of news bulletins and hosted 3,000+ podcast episodes.The podcast title refers to those who may wish to change their speaking voice in some way. It is not a suggestion that anyone should, or be pressured into needing to. We love accents and dialects, and are well aware that how we speak changes over time. The key is: is your voice successfully communicating your message, so it is being understood (and potentially being acted upon) by your target audience?This podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects.Music credits: all Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license"Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flow
12/2/2021

0336 – The Feedback Loop – Part 2

Season 1, Ep. 336
2021.12.02 – 0336 – The Feedback Loop – Part 2When we are in a studio, we don’t have this verbal and non-verbal feedback loop because the audience is unseen: we can’t see their nods of agreement, or hear their “uh-huhs” of understanding, and so it’s tricky for us to adjust our mode of delivery, and therefore to sound natural.We need to create a construct of conversationality while reading a written text aloud. You know what it’s like when you’re talking to someone at a barbecue or business gathering, and they are looking over your shoulder distracted by someone else they’d rather be talking to? What you are saying just peters out. Perhaps you’ve been in the situation with your kids or partner – you are talking and feel as though they’re not actively listening. If the feedback loop exists at all its maybe just “uh-huh”, “yeah”, “I see” … You may even have said something totally outrageous to check that the loop isn’t entirely broken “… and then I thought I’d run stark naked through the church ladies reading circle” to jolt them into attention and authentic reaction.In summary: When you are talking to someone in front of you, you see their reaction: they lean in to show their interest, they look away and are distracted by something else, they nod in agreement … the relationship is two-sided and reciprocal, and leads you as the message-deliverer change your style to further engage them. But you do not experience this in a studio environment. And that’s why it’s tricky.And we’ll look at the tricks to overcome this trickiness over the next short while.Audio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter StewartThrough these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection and projection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a career spent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode!And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTER BROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE.Look out for more details of the book during 2022.Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_StewartPeter has been around voice and audio all his working life and has trained hundreds of broadcasters in all styles of radio from pop music stations such as Capital FM and BBC Radio 1, the classical music station BBC Radio 3 and regional BBC stations. He’s trained news presenters on regional TV, the BBC News Channel and on flagship programmes such as the BBC’s Panorama.The podcast title refers to those who may wish to change their speaking voice in some way. It is not a suggestion that anyone should, or be pressured into needing to. We love accents and dialects, and are well aware that how we speak changes over time. The key is: is your voice successfully communicating your message, so it is being understood (and potentially being acted upon) by your target audience?This podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects.Music credits: all Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license"Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flow
12/1/2021

0335 – Mouth Open, Eyes Closed

Season 1, Ep. 335
2021.12.01 – 0335 – Mouth Open, Eyes ClosedI once knew a man who spoke in a very loud voice. He commanded the conversation both with his volume and also with his body language, because when he spoke in his overbearing, bumptious tone… he’d close his eyes.What he was doing was shutting out all external signals that would have told him to cede the floor: he would not see someone stepping back, looking away, shaking their head and so on, which meant he could continue barking until he had finished what he wanted to say.It may come as no surprise that the arrogant man was a local politician.Audio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter StewartThrough these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection and projection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a career spent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode!And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTER BROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE.Look out for more details of the book during 2022.Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_StewartPeter has been around voice and audio all his working life and has trained hundreds of broadcasters in all styles of radio from pop music stations such as Capital FM and BBC Radio 1, the classical music station BBC Radio 3 and regional BBC stations. He’s trained news presenters on regional TV, the BBC News Channel and on flagship programmes such as the BBC’s Panorama.He has written a number of books on audio and video presentation and production (see contacts clink above) and presented hundreds of radio shows (you may have heard him on BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 4, Virgin Radio or Kiss, as well as BBC regional radio) with various formats. He has read tens of thousands of news bulletins and hosted 3,000+ podcast episodes.The podcast title refers to those who may wish to change their speaking voice in some way. It is not a suggestion that anyone should, or be pressured into needing to. We love accents and dialects, and are well aware that how we speak changes over time. The key is: is your voice successfully communicating your message, so it is being understood (and potentially being acted upon) by your target audience?This podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects.Music credits: all Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license"Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flow
11/30/2021

0334 – The Broken Feedback Loop

Season 1, Ep. 334
2021.11.30 – 0334 – The Broken Feedback LoopIn a face-to-face or even voice-to-voice conversation (such as a phone call), most people constantly monitor their role in relation to others:·taking turns so they don’t monopolise a conversation·the speaker adds verbal checks to confirm that the other person is listening and understanding (“you know what I mean?”)·the listener adds verbal confirmations back to the speaker to show they are listening and understanding (“Go on…”, “oh yeah?”) or negative feedback to signal a desire to end the conversation (“O-kaaaaay”, “Right!”) or to hurry them on (“uh-huh, uh-huh, uh-huh”).·there’s non-verbal feedback such as nodding, holding eye contact as a way to encourage and engage… or folding arms and looking away to signal boredom and a desire to escape, or stepping back if someone is too loud and imposing·and so onAudio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter StewartThrough these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection and projection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a career spent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode!And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTER BROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE.Look out for more details of the book during 2022.Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_StewartPeter has been around voice and audio all his working life and has trained hundreds of broadcasters in all styles of radio from pop music stations such as Capital FM and BBC Radio 1, the classical music station BBC Radio 3 and regional BBC stations. He’s trained news presenters on regional TV, the BBC News Channel and on flagship programmes such as the BBC’s Panorama.He has written a number of books on audio and video presentation and production (see contacts clink above) and presented hundreds of radio shows (you may have heard him on BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 4, Virgin Radio or Kiss, as well as BBC regional radio) with various formats. He has read tens of thousands of news bulletins and hosted 3,000+ podcast episodes.The podcast title refers to those who may wish to change their speaking voice in some way. It is not a suggestion that anyone should, or be pressured into needing to. We love accents and dialects, and are well aware that how we speak changes over time. The key is: is your voice successfully communicating your message, so it is being understood (and potentially being acted upon) by your target audience?This podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects.Music credits: all Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license"Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flow
11/29/2021

0333 – The Big Projection Problem

Season 1, Ep. 333
2021.11.29 – 0333 – The Big Projection ProblemThe big problem is that in our line of work - broadcasting, podcasting or voice-overing – we are in an ‘unnatural situation’. A million years ago, our prehistoric ancestors would talk, live, to a handful of people who were standing nearby. Then as communities grew, people would talk live to larger crowds standing in front of them. Today, we sit alone in a room, and talk to far greater numbers of people, who we can’t see but who are all listening alone rather than together, and indeed may not be listening live at all – but at some point, further in the future…Audio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter StewartThrough these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection and projection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a career spent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode!And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTER BROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE.Look out for more details of the book during 2022.Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_StewartPeter has been around voice and audio all his working life and has trained hundreds of broadcasters in all styles of radio from pop music stations such as Capital FM and BBC Radio 1, the classical music station BBC Radio 3 and regional BBC stations. He’s trained news presenters on regional TV, the BBC News Channel and on flagship programmes such as the BBC’s Panorama.He has written a number of books on audio and video presentation and production (see contacts clink above) and presented hundreds of radio shows (you may have heard him on BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 4, Virgin Radio or Kiss, as well as BBC regional radio) with various formats. He has read tens of thousands of news bulletins and hosted 3,000+ podcast episodes.The podcast title refers to those who may wish to change their speaking voice in some way. It is not a suggestion that anyone should, or be pressured into needing to. We love accents and dialects, and are well aware that how we speak changes over time. The key is: is your voice successfully communicating your message, so it is being understood (and potentially being acted upon) by your target audience?This podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects.Music credits: all Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license"Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flow
11/28/2021

0332 – Presenting Projections on TV and Radio

Season 1, Ep. 332
2021.11.28 – 0332 – Presenting Projections on TV and RadioIn television a conversational projection is more appropriate because the reader has an illusion of eye contact with the audience, and television audiences offer more of their undivided attention than do radio listeners.Radio presenters have to work harder to cut through distractions and background noise before reaching the listener, especially if you are being heard on somebody’s car radio or in a living room full of hyperactive two-year-olds. Yelling is not the way to make sure every syllable is heard – clear diction is.Podcasters are perhaps slightly different again – you are often going into someone’s ears via headphones or earbuds, so there’s no background noise to cut through, and so a more focussed delivery may sound too strident.Audio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter StewartThrough these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection and projection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a career spent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode!And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTER BROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE.Look out for more details of the book during 2022.Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_StewartPeter has been around voice and audio all his working life and has trained hundreds of broadcasters in all styles of radio from pop music stations such as Capital FM and BBC Radio 1, the classical music station BBC Radio 3 and regional BBC stations. He’s trained news presenters on regional TV, the BBC News Channel and on flagship programmes such as the BBC’s Panorama.He has written a number of books on audio and video presentation and production (see contacts clink above) and presented hundreds of radio shows (you may have heard him on BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 4, Virgin Radio or Kiss, as well as BBC regional radio) with various formats. He has read tens of thousands of news bulletins and hosted 3,000+ podcast episodes.The podcast title refers to those who may wish to change their speaking voice in some way. It is not a suggestion that anyone should, or be pressured into needing to. We love accents and dialects, and are well aware that how we speak changes over time. The key is: is your voice successfully communicating your message, so it is being understood (and potentially being acted upon) by your target audience?This podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects.Music credits: all Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license"Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flow
11/27/2021

0331 – Interpretations of Projections

Season 1, Ep. 331
2021.11.27 – 0331 – Interpretations of Projections Loud speakers can come over as assured and energetic - or aggressive or bumptious, full of themselves, larger than life, maybe a bit of a bully. They can’t or won’t monitor how their message is being received – and so don’t dial back from 11, and leave the listener feeling attacked and wanting to disengage from the message. Softer speakers can seem meek, mild and unsure of themselves or their content. A listener may consider they have less credibility and so lower their expectations of their performance or professionalism. Or they may think that the speaker is calm and assured. It is therefore a good idea when speaking one-to-one to consider whether how you speak is making other people feel uncomfortable. Are they having to lean in to listen, or backing away from the force of the voice?Using an appropriate volume makes a big difference in how we are perceived by others. But if you use loudness or softness inappropriately in your presentation, your message will be confused and you may be perceived as peculiar. Having said that, varying your volume (and intonation) will help aid attention and give communication clarity.With so much about your voice and professional presentation, there’s a balance.Audio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter StewartThrough these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection and projection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a career spent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode!And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTER BROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE.Look out for more details of the book during 2022.Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_StewartPeter has written a number of books on audio and video presentation and production (see contacts clink above) and presented hundreds of radio shows (you may have heard him on BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 4, Virgin Radio or Kiss, as well as BBC regional radio) with various formats. He has read tens of thousands of news bulletins and hosted 3,000+ podcast episodes.The podcast title refers to those who may wish to change their speaking voice in some way. It is not a suggestion that anyone should, or be pressured into needing to. We love accents and dialects, and are well aware that how we speak changes over time. The key is: is your voice successfully communicating your message, so it is being understood (and potentially being acted upon) by your target audience?This podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects.Music credits: all Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license"Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flow
11/26/2021

0330 – Why Various Voice Volumes Are Vital

Season 1, Ep. 330
2021.11.26 – 0330 – Why Various Voice Volumes Are VitalWhy ‘Various Voice Volumes Are Vital’So why is cranking the dial up or down so useful both with scripts and adlibs?In natural English-presentation, more volume and projection are used:·to add emphasis to important content·when we are excited about the content·when we are speaking with a several people, or those who are further away·when we are angry·when we consider the listener doesn’t understand the message.In natural English-presentation, less volume and projection are used to:·suggest intimacy or privacy or trust·entice people to listen more carefully·give an impression of Halloween creepiness, that is quiet, understated threatsAudio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter StewartThrough these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection and projection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a career spent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode!And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTER BROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE.Look out for more details of the book during 2022.Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_StewartPeter has been around voice and audio all his working life and has trained hundreds of broadcasters in all styles of radio from pop music stations such as Capital FM and BBC Radio 1, the classical music station BBC Radio 3 and regional BBC stations. He’s trained news presenters on regional TV, the BBC News Channel and on flagship programmes such as the BBC’s Panorama.He has written a number of books on audio and video presentation and production (see contacts clink above) and presented hundreds of radio shows (you may have heard him on BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 4, Virgin Radio or Kiss, as well as BBC regional radio) with various formats. He has read tens of thousands of news bulletins and hosted 3,000+ podcast episodes.The podcast title refers to those who may wish to change their speaking voice in some way. It is not a suggestion that anyone should, or be pressured into needing to. We love accents and dialects, and are well aware that how we speak changes over time. The key is: is your voice successfully communicating your message, so it is being understood (and potentially being acted upon) by your target audience?This podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects.Music credits: all Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license"Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flow
11/25/2021

0329 – What Is ‘Energy’?

Season 1, Ep. 329
2021.11.25 – 0329 – What Is ‘Energy’?Energy (or ‘presence’)This is slightly different from both volume and projection, but does have elements of those within it.‘Energy’ is subtle and complex, and is a mix of various elements of your body and mind. So, an ‘energetic presentation’ might be a mix of varying degrees of:Your Body·Volume – but you’re not shouting·Projection – but you’re not too intense·Pace - but not like an action-packed livestock auctioneer·Resonance – from your foundation in better diaphragmatic breathing which we studied in some depth previously·Pitch – it is difficult to be very energetic for very long with a high voice because of the strain on the vocal folds. (As we saw earlier this is not necessarily a male/female issue: a higher pitch can come about through nerves, poor breathing and so on)·Intonation – an energetic performance is likely to have a degree more modulation in intonation, more ‘voice variety’.Elements of your energy will also come from how you think and feel about your presentation:Your Mind·Knowledge, passion, enthusiasm and conviction – that is, speaking with focus and intention, turning off the ‘autopilot’ and being connected to your content. You can do this by imagining that this is one of the first times you have explained this story or sold this product, visualising what happened, picturing the people involved – almost experiencing what you are saying along with the audience.·Being ‘present’ – giving your full attention to your script or presentation, not allowing yourself to be distracted by kids or to-do lists, emails or voicemails. Focussing in and not ‘phoning it in’, reading the room rather than reading a script.Audio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter StewartThrough these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection and projection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a career spent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode!And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTER BROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE.Look out for more details of the book during 2022.Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_StewartThis podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects.Music credits: all Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license"Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flow