Work and Life with Stew Friedman

9/18/2020

Ep 181. Quinetta Roberson: The Impact of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Professor Quinetta Roberson has over 20 years of experience teaching courses and workshops globally on leadership, talent management and diversity, and her research and teaching are informed by her background in finance, having worked as a financial analyst and small business development consultant. She’s also served as an expert witness in employment discrimination lawsuits and provides professional advice and guidance to for-profit and non-profit organizations. Quinetta earned her Ph.D. in organizational behavior from the University of Maryland and holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in finance. Her research interests focus on developing organizational capability and enhancing effectiveness through the strategic management of people, particularly diverse work teams. To summarize some of her experiences and insights from working with organizations, she delivered a TED talk on The Science of Inclusion at the 2013 TEDxVillanova conference. She currently serves as President of the Academy of Management (AOM) for 2020-2021.In this episode, Stew and Quinetta discuss the benefits of diversity, equity and inclusion (after parsing out important distinctions among these three terms, often referred to collectively as “DEI”) for teams and organizations with respect to productivity, retention, and the bottom line. Quinetta shares her research on equity and justice with teams and provides guidance for how to make DEI efforts succeed, starting with a clear sense of purpose as to the expected impact on organization performance.Here then is an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation. Ask yourself this question: If you were to take a step toward a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive work environment, why would you do it? How, in other words, would you want your team organization to benefit? And, how, by asking this, does your perspective change on what you might do to affect positive change? Write to Stew to let him know, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with him on this episode and your ideas for people you’d like to hear on future shows.
9/11/2020

Ep 180. Christopher Marquis: How B Corps are Remaking Capitalism

Christopher Marquis is the Samuel C. Johnson Professor in Global Sustainable Enterprise and Professor of Management at Cornell University. His current teaching and research focus on the two areas of social innovation and change and doing business in China. Prior to joining Cornell, Chris worked for 10 years at Harvard Business School and has held visiting positions at Harvard’s Kennedy School, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peking University, Fudan University, and Shanghai Jiaotong University. He received a PhD in sociology and business administration from the University of Michigan.In this episode, Stew and Chris discuss his new book, Better Business: How the B Corp Movement Is Remaking Capitalism. Chris reviews the meaning and intent of a B Corp, how this differs from corporate social responsibility initiatives, and why the essential features of B Corps are good for all businesses and their people. They get into why and how the U.S. differs from other industrialized nations in resisting stakeholder (as opposed to shareholder) models. Chris reviews common forms of resistance to taking on social issues -- including the environment, racial and economic justice -- and how to overcome these obstacles to positive change. They discuss generational trends in corporate social responsibility and how the pandemic, the resultant economic crisis, and increased awareness of systemic racism may reshape corporate America.Here then is an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation. What might you be able to try, in your work environment, that is consistent with the B Corp movement’s principles, that you believe would increase its value as a business? Write to Stew to let him know, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with him on this episode and your ideas for people you’d like to hear on future shows.
9/4/2020

Ep 179. Natalie Edwards: Changing the Conversation about Race and Work

Natalie Neilson Edwards is the Director of Inclusion & Diversity for The Estee Lauder Companies. Shejoined Estee Lauder in May of 2018 after graduating with her MBA from the Wharton School, with a concentration in business analytics. She leads inclusion strategy and operations for all 45,000 Estee Lauder employees and 25+ brands. While at Wharton, Natalie drafted the school’s official diversity plan, working with the Dean as the Wharton Graduate Association's VP of Diversity and as one of the only student members of the Diversity Strategy & Policy Task Force. She was instrumental in doubling the black student population in one year. She has a BA in finance from Howard University where she was Female Graduate of the Year.In this episode, Stew and Natalie discuss the challenges employees at all levels face discussing and grappling with race and how to help them do so more effectively.She describes what she learned from her experience about this issue growing up in suburban Houston and throughout her academic and professional career, including as a student at Wharton in Stew’s Total Leadership course.Natalie addresses what makes it hard to engage in meaningful dialogue about race and what we all can do to deal with deeply-ingrained sources of resistance and fear and thereby build a better tomorrow.Here then is an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation.Look for an opportunity to have a conversation about race with a co-worker using the insights you gained from hearing Natalie’s ideas.What did you discover that you can apply now and in the future?Write to Stew to let him know, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn.While you’re at it, share your thoughts with him on this episode and your ideas for people you’d like to hear on future shows.
8/28/2020

Ep 178. Howard Stevenson: Racial Literacy

Dr. Howard Stevenson is the Constance Clayton Professor of Urban Education, Professor of Africana Studies, in the Human Development & Quantitative Methods Division of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Stevenson is Executive Director of the Racial Empowerment Collaborative (REC) at Penn, a research, program development, and training center that brings together community leaders, researchers, authority figures, families, and youth to study and promote racial literacy and health in schools and neighborhoods. He is also the Director of Forward Promise, a national program office funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. It provides philanthropic support for organizations designed to improve the health of boys and young men of color and their families, and to help them heal from the trauma of historical and present-day dehumanization, discrimination, and colonization. Since 1985, Dr. Stevenson has served as a clinical and consulting psychologist working in impoverished rural and urban neighborhoods across the country.In this episode, Stew and Howard discuss the subtle, sometimes unintended or even unconscious ways by which we communicate about race, especially to our children. Howard draws on his personal history and his experience as a clinical psychologist, educator, and negotiator, in vividly describing his method of teaching racial literacy -- a systematic approach that helps people learn how to read, recast, and resolve racially tinged episodes. He also demonstrates key elements of his method with Stew as his subject, which takes our host back 58 years to an incident in his fifth grade class in a Brooklyn public school.Here then is an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation. Reach back into your history and recount a story in which you experienced a racial conflict, however subtle, using the tools Howard used in working with Stew in this episode to help you make sense of what happened with the benefit of hindsight. What do you discover that you can apply now and in the future? Write to Stew to let him know, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with him on this episode and your ideas for people you’d like to hear on future shows.
8/14/2020

Ep 177. Stephanie Creary: Be a Better Ally to Your Black Colleagues

Stephanie Creary, Assistant Professor of Management at the Wharton School, has been teaching a course called “Leading Diversity in Organizations” since Fall 2017. She was one of the principal investigators on a report from Wharton’s People Analytics Department and the firm Diversity Inc. that shows which practices seem to work for companies. Stephanie recently authored a piece in Harvard Business Review called “How to Be a Better Ally to Your Black Friends”. Her research centers on identifying and understanding the work that individuals and leaders do to manage identity in asymmetric relationships – where power differentials between relationship partners are high – and how their efforts shape self-views, relationship quality, and the performance of work. Her research also examines the effectiveness of diversity and inclusion practices. She is a founding faculty member of the Wharton IDEAS lab (Identity, Diversity, Engagement, Affect, and Social Relationships), an affiliated faculty member of Wharton People Analytics, a Senior Fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics (LDI), and affiliated faculty member of the Penn Center for Africana Studies. She heads the Leading Diversity@Wharton Speaker Series as part of her Leading Diversity in Organizations course at Wharton.In this episode, Stew and Stephanie discuss diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace, what seems to work and what doesn’t, how to be an effective ally for minority voices, and how to acknowledge and confront systemic racism to make our workplaces and our society more equitable and productive.Here then is an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation, if you’re interested in practicing to be a better ally to your Black colleagues. Find one with whom you can talk and express, in your own way, that you’re interested in listening and in trying to understand, to better related, to their experience. Write to Stew to let him know what you discover, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with him on this episode and your ideas for people you’d like to hear on future shows.
8/7/2020

Ep 176. Marisa Porges: How to Raise Bold, Courageous, Resilient Women

Dr. Marisa Porges is known for her work on leadership, education, and national security. She is currently head of The Baldwin School, a 130-year-old all-girls school outside of Philadelphia renowned for academic excellence and for preparing girls to be leaders and changemakers. Prior to joining Baldwin in 2016, Dr. Porges served in the Obama White House; was a visiting fellow at Harvard Kennedy School and at the Council on Foreign Relations, where her research focused on worldwide counterterrorism efforts; and served in the US Navy as one of eight female aviators in an air wing of about two hundred. She graduated from Harvard University in and earned her doctorate from King’s College London. Her new book is What Girls Need: How to Raise Bold, Courageous, and Resilient Women.In this episode, Stew and Marisa discuss the unique challenges educators and parents everywhere are currently facing during the pandemic and the resurgent awareness of what we must do to pursue a just society. They talk about the perennial difficulties of empowering young women and helping to ensure they not only have equal access to educational and job opportunities, but also to the support they need to thrive and achieve in all aspects of life. Marisa shares some of the many practical tips from her new book that anyone who’s interested in teaching girls how to be strong and adaptable can use.Here then is an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation. What opportunity might you be able to create, however small, for a girl you know to experience the growth the results from expressing herself and increasing her belief that she can control her own destiny? Write to Stew to let him know: friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with him on this episode and your ideas for people you’d like to hear on future shows.
7/24/2020

Ep 175. Laura Morgan Roberts: Race, Work, and Leadership in Pandemic Times

Dr. Laura Morgan Roberts is a Professor of Practice at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business and an expert in the science of maximizing human potential in diverse organizations and communities. She has published over fifty research articles, teaching cases, and practitioner-oriented tools for strategically activating best selves through strength-based development, workplace equity and inclusion. Her influential publications in the Harvard Business Review and the Academy of Management Review on diversity, authenticity and leadership development have been recognized by Thinkers50 “On the Radar” (2018) and the Academy of Management. Laura is the 2020 inaugural recipient of the Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Award for Societal Impact. She has edited three books: Race, Work and Leadership; Positive Organizing in a Global Society; and Exploring Positive Identities and Organizations.In this episode, Stew and Laura talk about microaggressions, code-switching and the powerful, practical ideas in her HBR article, Working from Home While Black. The pandemic’s breaking of the wall between home and work has had unintended negative repercussions for Black employees. They talk about what it takes to be an effective ally in acting to produce change, including concrete strategies that move us toward sustainable racial justice at work and beyond.Here then is an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation. What small step might you take to speak truth to power in ways that advance our collective interest in a more just society, starting with the people in your work life. Write to Stew to let him know: friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with him on this episode and your ideas for people you’d like to hear on future shows.
7/19/2020

Ep 174. Rita McGrath: Seeing Around Corners

Rita McGrath, Columbia Business School Professor, is an expert on inflection points, paradigmatic shifts in the landscape. Rita has received the #1 achievement award for strategy from the prestigious Thinkers50 and has been consistently named one of the world’s Top 10 management thinkers in its bi-annual ranking. She received her Ph.D. from Wharton and has degrees with honors from Barnard College and the Columbia School of International and Public Affairs. Her recent book Seeing Around Corners:How to Spot Inflection Points in Business Before They Happen is about how effective leaders and teams see those shifts coming before they happen and can react in innovative ways to succeed.In this episode, Stew and Rita talk about how to see around unpredictable, unprecedented, or blind corners in order to make the best decisions for employees, students, teachers, staff, families, and communities during this pandemic period. They discuss how remote work is radically altering our social and business landscape, creating opportunities for radical innovation, including in the ways and means of our communal commitment to raising and educating children.Here then is an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation. Think about where “the snow is melting” in your world, metaphorically speaking, and ask yourself how this weak signal might affect what’s next in your life. Write to Stew Friedman to let him know, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with Stew on this episode and your ideas for people you’d like to hear on future shows.For more about Rita McGrath’s great work, visit www.rita.mcgrath.com, and subscribe to her newsletter.
7/10/2020

Ep 173. Stefanie Johnson: Inclusify -- The Power of Uniqueness and Belonging

Stefanie Johnson is an associate professor at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business and her new book is Inclusify: The Power of Uniqueness and Belonging to Build Innovative Teams. Professor Johnson studies the intersection of leadership and diversity, focusing on how unconscious bias affects the evaluation of leaders and on strategies that leaders can use to mitigate bias. She draws on her own experience as a Latina who grew up poor to inform her research. She is a member of the MG 100 Coaches, was selected for the 2020 Thinkers50 Radar List, and has presented her work at over 170 meetings around the world, including at the White House for a 2016 summit on diversity in corporate America on National Equal Pay Day.In this episode, Stew and Stefanie talk about how she has evolved in her thoughts and feelings about what it takes to create cultures that both celebrate individual differences and build a sense of belonging among members. Stefanie draws an important distinction between “diversity” and “inclusion” and she describes the various styles of leadership as they relate to the challenge of leading diverse, inclusive organizations. Based on her extensive research, Stefanie offers suggestions for what leaders at all levels can do to overcome the hurdles that stand in the way of inclusifying work organizations.Here then is an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation. Take the inclusify quiz here and find out which one of the leadership types suits you best. Then, try one of the recommended actions. What do you discover? Write to Stew Friedman to let him know, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with Stew on this episode and your ideas for people you’d like to hear on future shows.