Work and Life with Stew Friedman

7/3/2020

Ep 172. Karl Moore: We Are All Ambiverts

Karl Moore is an Associate Professor on the management faculty of McGill University. Prior to his academic career Dr. Moore worked for eleven years in sales and marketing management positions with IBM and Hitachi. Before McGill, he taught at Oxford University for five years. Since 2014, Karl has hosted the CEO Series, a weekly program on Bellmedia’s C-J-A-D, where he interviews leaders one-on-one. He has been blogging for Forbes for eight years.In this episode, Stew and Karl discuss his forthcoming book, We’re All Ambiverts Now. They explore the tendencies we have to express either introversion or extroversion and how, in order to be effective as leaders, we have to learn to sometimes act in a way that’s inconsistent with our natural inclinations. But to do so can be exhausting, so it’s useful to take account of the costs of acting like an extrovert if you’re an introvert, and vice versa, and to then do something to rejuvenate and restore yourself following such episodes in your daily life.Here then is an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation. If you’re an extrovert, what introvert-like action might you try taking that you expect would help you be more effective either at work or at home? And, if you’re an introvert, what extravert-like action might you try taking that you expect would help you be more effective at work or at home? What do you discover, especially about how it feels to try to act in a way that’s counter to your natural tendency and the impact of your doing so?Write to Stew Friedman to let him know, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with Stew on this episode and your ideas for people you’d like to hear on future shows.
6/20/2020

Ep 170. Christine Beckman: Living, Working and Parenting in the Digital Age

Christine Beckman is The Price Family Chair in Social Innovation and Professor of Public Policy at the Price Center for Social Innovation in the Sol Price School of Public Policy at the University of Southern California, and the author of Dreams of the Overworked: Living, Working and Parenting in the Digital Age. Before joining the Price School in 2018, she was a Professor in the Department of Management and Organization at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. She also taught at UC Irvine. Christine is a widely-known and highly visible scholar in the field of Management and Organization. She is a native Californian and received her undergraduate and graduate degrees from Stanford University.In this episode, Stew and Christine talk about the pluses and minuses of technology for working families, especially during these pandemic times, when so many are working from home for the first time and when parents are attempting to manage remote school work for their children. They discuss the ills and potential benefits of social media and strategies for harnessing technology as a force for good. And they address the ways both social policy and individual initiative can strength the social support, or scaffolding, working families need now more than ever.Here’s an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation. Choose a person in your life who provides support that enables you to be the person you want to be and thank them for what they provide, and let them know how by their helping you they are enabling you to make things better for others.What do you discover? Write to Stew Friedman to let him know, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with Stew on this episode and ideas for future shows.
6/12/2020

Ep 169. Doug Conant: The Blueprint for Growth as a Leader

Doug Conant is an expert on leadership. He began his career at General Mills and held leadership positions in marketing and strategy at Kraft before becoming CEO and President of Campbell Soup Company. During his career he also served as President of Nabisco Foods Company, and Chairman of Avon Products. Over the course of his ten years as CEO at Campbell, employee engagement skyrocketed from being among the worst in the Fortune 500 to being world-class as measured by Gallup. After retiring from Campbell Soup Company, Doug founded ConantLeadership: a mission-driven community of leaders and learners who are championing leadership that works. As CEO of ConantLeadership, he takes no salary, and all profits (after covering operating costs) are donated to charitable organizations at the forefront of championing the kind of leadership that can move society forward. He’s now put all of the lessons he learned into a new book -- The Blueprint: 6 Practical Steps to Lift Your Leadership to New Heights -- that he hopes will help you to realize your full potential as a leader and as a contributing member of society.In this episode, Stew and Doug discuss leadership in the context of the current social, political, and economic challenges we all face and what’s required, for anyone, to gain greater competence as a leader. Doug’s compassionate and human-centered approach to leadership growth is practical and relevant for now.Here’s an invitation, a challenge, for you, once you’ve listened to the conversation. Identify your “entourage of excellence,” as Doug calls the people in your life whom you admire and want to emulate. Then, do what he suggests: Simply make a conscious effort to try to be more like those people. What do you discover? Write to Stew Friedman to let him know, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with Stew on this episode and ideas for future shows.
5/29/2020

Ep 168. David Smith: How to be a Good Guy

Dr. David Smith is co-author of the forthcoming book Good Guys: How Men Can Be Better Allies for Women in the Workplace. David is an Associate Professor of Sociology in the College of Leadership and Ethics at the U.S. Naval War College. His previous book, Athena Rising: How and Why Men Should Mentor Women, was named one of 25 books everyone should read by Inc. Magazine and TED Speakers when it was published in 2016. A former Navy pilot, Dr. Smith led diverse organizations of women and men culminating in command of a squadron in combat and flew more than 3,000 hours over 30 years including combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. As a sociologist trained in military sociology and social psychology, he focuses his research in gender, work, and family issues including gender bias in performance evaluations, dual career families, military families, women in the military, and retention of women.In this episode, Stew and David talk about the various ways men can, and must, step up to help make our workplaces and our society more conducive to equal pay for equal work for women. Despite the many gains women have made in the workplace, there remains a pernicious pay gap and the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the sorry fact that women are still doing what Arlie Hochschild decades ago called the “second shift” -- childcare and household work above and beyond their paid work outside the home. In this conversation about Good Guys, David explains why it’s in all our interests for this to change and he offers practical guidance for how men can overcome resistance to making it happen.Here’s an invitation, my dear gentlemen, a challenge for you to consider, after you’ve listened to this episode and learned more about what it takes to be an ally. Find an opportunity in the next day or so to inquire of a woman in your life -- just ask and listen, that is -- about inequities she has experienced or seen. What do you discover? Write to Stew Friedman to let him know, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with Stew on this episode and ideas for future shows.
5/22/2020

Ep 167. Bruce Dailsley: Eat Sleep Work Repeat

Bruce Daisley is European Vice President of Twitter, based in London, and his new book is called Eat Sleep Work Repeat: 30 Hacks for Bringing Joy to Your Job. Bruce joined Twitter in 2012, having previously run YouTube UK at Google. He has also worked in the magazine publishing and radio industries, having got his first break by mailing a cartoon resume of his life to prospective employers. Bruce's passion for improving work led to him creating the podcast “Eat Sleep Work Repeat” which became a number 1 smash in the UK (also hitting the business top 10 in the US).In this episode, Stew and Bruce talk about the pandemic’s impact on how we are managing the blurred lines between work and home, where social media fits into this brave new world, and how we can all keep our energy, enthusiasm, and creativity going in these difficult times. Bruce shares some of his favorite hacks from among the 30 he offers in Eat Sleep Work Repeat for how to bring more joy to work.Here’s an invitation, a challenge, for you to consider, after you’ve listened to this episode. If your work involves online video meetings, try adding a few minutes to one of them, at the start, where you bring something human to the conversation -- a funny story, an unexpected encounter, anything that helps everyone feel a bit closer as people, more than just co-workers. What do you discover? Write to Stew Friedman to let him know, at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu, or connect with him on LinkedIn. While you’re at it, share your thoughts with Stew on this episode and ideas for future shows.
5/15/2020

Ep 166. Chester Elton: Leading With Gratitude

Chester Elton is one of today’s most influential voices in workplace trends and is the co-author of Leading with Gratitude: Eight Leadership Practices for Extraordinary Business Results. Chester is the co-founder of The Culture Works, a global training company, and a board member of Camp Corral, a non-profit for the children of wounded and fallen military heroes. He serves as a leadership consultant to firms such as American Express, AT&T, Avis Budget Group and Procter & Gamble. In 2018 Global Gurus research organization ranked him as #13 in the world’s top leadership experts and #5 in the world’s top organizational culture experts; and he is a member of Marshall Goldsmith’s 100 Coaches pay it forward project.In this episode, Stew and Chester discuss the pandemic’s impact on workplace culture and on how leaders -- of all sorts and in all social environments, including the family -- can express gratitude and appreciation for their people and reap great benefits from doing so. Chester offers a bunch of practical, easy-to-implement ideas for what anyone can do to enrich their lives and those of the people around them by being more conscious and deliberate about showing others that you value who they are and what they do.Here’s an, a challenge, for you to consider, after you’ve listened to this episode. Try, for the next few days, thinking, writing, or speaking out loud -- just before you retire and head off to dreamland -- noting the two or three things that you were grateful for during the day that’s ending. Write to Stew Friedman to let him know what you discover at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu or connect with him on LinkedIn. And, while you’re at it, share your thoughts on this episode and ideas for future shows.
5/8/2020

Ep 165. Jennifer Goldman-Wetzler: Free Yourself From Conflict

Jennifer Goldman-Wetzler is a leading expert on conflict and organizational psychology. She’s also the founder and CEO of Alignment Strategies Group, and author of Optimal Outcomes: Free Yourself from Conflict at Work, at Home and in Life, which was selected as a Financial Times Book of the Month. For two decades, Jennifer has advised senior leaders at global corporations as well as at large non-profit and governmental institutions. A former counterterrorism research fellow with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, she received her B.A. with honors from Tufts University and holds a Ph.D. in Social-Organizational Psychology from Columbia University. She currently writes the Achieving Conflict Freedom column at Psychology Today, and serves as Adjunct Professor in the Department of Organization and Leadership at Columbia University, where she teaches a popular course on conflict freedom.In this episode, Stew and Jennifer discuss conflict, how to recognize your typical response patterns, and ways to capitalize on the emotions engendered by conflicts and use them to de-escalate and find a new way forward. As so many are confined with family members or other housemates during the pandemic, conflicts about childcare, work schedules, household chores, and other issues have risen to the fore. Tools for breaking through conflict are needed now more than ever. Jennifer illustrates how her research helps people find pattern-breaking avenues including by focusing, for example, on shared values.Here’s a challenge, an invitation, for you to consider, after you’ve listened to this episode: Think of a conflict from which you’d like to be free and sketch its optimal outcome, as Jennifer describes it. See what you discover from seeing new possibilities through this lens.Share your thoughts on this episode and ideas for future shows with Stew Friedman at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu or connect with him on LinkedIn.
5/1/2020

Ep 164. Michelle Travis: Dads for Daughters

Michelle Travis is a law professor at the University of San Francisco’s School of Law, where she serves as a Director of USF’s Labor and Employment Law Program. She is an expert on employment discrimination law and serves as the Co-Director of USF’s Labor and Employment Law Program. Her research focuses on sex discrimination, gender stereotypes, work/family conflict, and disability discrimination in the workplace. She teaches courses on employment law and civil litigation, and she has won multiple teaching awards. She has a J.D. from Stanford Law School and a B.A. in psychology from Cornell University, and is also the author of an award-winning children’s picture book, My Mom Has Two Jobs, which celebrates working moms. She has a new book out, Dads For Daughters: How Fathers Can Give their Daughters a Better, Brighter, Fairer Future.In this episode, Stew and Michelle talk about the ways by which men can help empower women. In spite of the progress that’s been made, we still live in a world that’s profoundly unequal, with a massive gender pay gap and deeply-ingrained gender stereotypes. They discuss the various forms of resistance to change -- both psychological and cultural -- and steps that can be taken to to overcome them. And they explore how pandemic times present an unexpected opportunity for fathers to get more involved in caregiving and to raise their awareness of what it means to be a champion for gender equity.Here’s a challenge, an invitation, for you to consider, after you’ve listened to this episode: What small step can you now take to help make the world a more fair place for girls? Share your thoughts on this episode and ideas for future shows with Stew Friedman at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu or connect with him on LinkedIn.