Unfolding Maps

Share

#6: Great and small adventures – with Alastair Humphreys

A passionate adventurer, author and film maker: Alastair Humphreys' explorations of the earth are manifold.

He has spent over four years cycling round the world, a journey of 46,000 miles through 60 countries and five continents. He walked across southern India, rowed across the Atlantic Ocean, run six marathons through the Sahara Desert, completed a crossing of Iceland, busked through Spain, participated in an expedition in the Arctic, close to the magnetic North Pole, and has trekked 1000 miles across the Empty Quarter desert.

When he was named as one of National Geographic’s Adventurers of the year for 2012 however, it was for a much humbler endeavor: for creating and promoting the philosophy of microadventure.

In this episode of Unfolding Maps, Alastair talks about great and small adventures – and how they can enrich our lives.


Alastair on the web:

www.alastairhumphreys.com

Facebook

Instagram

More Episodes

4/17/2021

#24: Hope for our Planet – with Dr. Jane Goodall

60 years of research on social and family interactions of wild chimpanzees. And decades of commitment to animal welfare and environmental protection. This episode’s guest is the world-famous British ethologist and environmental activist, Dr. Jane Goodall, DBE.Originally, she has been best known for her long-term study of wild chimpanzees in Tanzania in the 1960s. During that study she discovered that chimpanzees make and use tools – a discovery that transformed the way we understand primates and wildlife, and that redefined the relationship between animals and humans.Today, her legacy goes far beyond that. She is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute, an international animal and environmental protection organization that is widely recognized for its conservation and development programs. She is also a United Nations Messenger of Peace and an honorary member of the World Future Council. And she does not show any signs of slowing down, despite being 87 years old now. If there is no pandemic preventing her from doing so, she travels an average of 300 days per year to advocate for the causes that she believes in, meeting with people from children and youth groups to powerful politicians, striving to promote a new kind of relationship with nature. Time magazine named her as one of the 100 most influential people in the world.In this episode, Dr. Goodall talks about her research in Tanzania and the beginnings of her involvement as an activist. She explains why she is not afraid to work even with supposed opponents, and reveals why she has never lost hope despite the many challenges we face around the world.More information on Dr. Jane Goodall and the work of the Jane Goodall Institute:https://www.janegoodall.org/https://www.instagram.com/janegoodallinst/https://www.facebook.com/janegoodallinst