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The Intelligence from The Economist

Once and future: Brazil’s Lula wins again

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, a leftist former president, has won again. Even if President Jair Bolsonaro gracefully concedes, his followers and fellow party members will make Lula’s hard job harder. We ask why California’s green-tinged Democratic governor is against a progressive ballot initiative on electric vehicles. And our say on the bread of the day of the dead. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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