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Venice Biennale Special: Aindrea Emelife interview

Welcome to the second of our episodes from the 60th International Art Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia.


I am delighted to welcome back Aindrea Emelife as my guest. Aindrea is a curator and art historian of modern and contemporary art, whose practise specializes in colonial and decolonial African histories and the politics of representation. Aindrea is the curator of Nigeria Imaginary at the Nigeria Pavilion at this year’s Venice Biennale, which sees the country participating in the festival for the second time. The pavilion will show projects made in collaboration with the Museum of West African Art, where Aindrea is also a curator. Today, we will be getting an exciting introduction into this year’s Nigeria Pavilion and

hearing a bit more about the participating artists, their works and the curatorial thinking behind this year’s exhibition.


Enjoy a review, including images of Nigeria Imaginary written by Anne Kimunguyi in today's special edition of Shade Art Review.


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Shade Podcast is Executive produced and hosted by Lou Mensah

Music King Henry IV for Shade Podcast by Brian Jackson

Editing and mixing by Tess Davidson

Editorial support by Anne Kimunguyi


Nigeria Imaginary

Aindrea Emelife


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  • Venice Biennale Special: Sir John Akomfrah interview

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