No Such Thing: Education in the Digital Age

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The "M" in STEM

Ep. 42

Buckle up for some real talk about solutions to our Math challenges that might sound simple in a lot of cases, but they certainly aren't obvious. If they were, we would've figured out a long time ago that, for example, "school math and real math" as Marvin puts it during this interview, should not and cannot be such very different things.


In this episode, Marc interviews researchers from Education Development Center's Center for Children and Technology and Bank Street College of Education, who are collaborating on an effort funded by the National Science Foundation and the Institute of Education Sciences at the U.S. Dept. of Department of Education, to help better equip educators supporting the wide variety of learners who populate the classrooms of American schools. Their program, Math For All, is developing digital resources to show general and special education teachers how to provide high-quality, standards-based math education to all students, including those with disabilities.


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