No Such Thing: Education in the Digital Age

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How Many Slaps To Cook a Chicken

Ep. 91

Upperline Code has a mission to train the next generation of computer science leaders and empower students to change their world with code. We aim to transform education by making computer science accessible to all students regardless of race, gender, or income. Above all, we value inclusiveness, curiosity, rigor, collaboration, and quality. 


"I think you created a culture of mutual learning and respect and demonstrated your commitment to the process over the end goal and that was very empowering. I think that it was the best PD I've engaged in so far." - Maha Hasen


Maha Hasen

Maha has an undergraduate degree in Applied Mathematics and Philosophy from The George Washington University. When she graduated in 2016, she was placed as a High School Math Teacher in her hometown, Bronx, NY, and earned her Master of Arts in Teaching from Relay Graduate School of Education. After consistently being made aware of the lack of female representation in STEM, Maha joined Upperline Code to gain the tools she needed to bring Computer Science to her school, which has a student body makeup of 71% female. She believes that all students should have access to computer science and that it is particularly imperative to empower female students to pursue a coding education!


Jorge Torres

Jorge Torres is in the middle of his third year teaching high school Chemistry and Physics in the South Bronx. He earned his undergraduate degree at CUNY Hunter College in Biochemistry, and continued there for his Master’s Degree in Chemistry Education. Jorge’s interest in Computer Science teaching came from both the interest his students seemed to have in the subject, as well as his own early experiences taking AP Computer Science in high school. He aimed to make the material more accessible for students like himself, and began to seek out institutions with the same goals as him. Jorge is excited to continue building his Computer Science skills, and at the same time bring all the knowledge acquired back to his classroom and continue to encourage students to pursue STEM careers. 


Daniel Fenjves

CEO Upperline Code

Danny Fenjves has spent almost 10 years living and teaching computer science. He is an alumnus of Teach for America, worked at Google, and was head of K-12 computer science instruction at Flatiron School before founding Upperline Code. In his career, he's trained over 200 teachers to lead immersive coding courses in schools across the country, built extensive coding curriculum, and taught software development to hundreds of high school students. As a former middle school science teacher, he's deeply committed to the art of instruction and discovering the best methods to recruit, train, and retain top teaching talent in the field of K-12 computer science education.


Mentioned in this episode:

Upperline Fellowship

The Six Flaws of “Traditional” Professional Development from Katya Rucker, Getting Smart

Education Week, Teacher PD Gets a Bad Rap. But Two Approaches Do Work, by Heather C. Hill



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