No Such Thing: Education in the Digital Age

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Game-based Assessment

Ep. 99

Game-based assessments (GBAs) have been shown to be a powerful context to measure students’ 21st century skills. By eliciting evidence of skills in an embedded, authentic and playful environment, they present the potential for assessments to go beyond measuring outcomes of content knowledge to shed light on thought processes.


Yoon Jeon (YJ) Kim is an Assistant Professor of Design, Creative, and Informal Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at UW–Madison. Before joining UW-Madison, she was the founder and director of MIT Playful Journey Lab where she led an interdisciplinary team of game designers, developers, and researchers to create playful assessment tools. Her work centers on the topic of innovative assessment and application of playful activity design to challenge what and how we are measuring learning. YJ’s playful assessment research ranges from a computer game using evidence-centered design and analytics techniques to paper-based embedded assessment tools for making. The core of her work is close


Louisa Rosenheck is a thought leader in the ed tech field, with a passion for game-based learning and playful pedagogies. She works to promote deeper learning through designing playful experiences, developing creative ways to assess learning, and building capacity in other organizations to implement innovative digital learning and curriculum in their own contexts. She is a co-author of the book Resonant Games and teaches a graduate course on ed tech design at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She spent over a decade doing research on digital games and creative learning at MIT, and is now the Director of Pedagogy for the Kahoot! Group.


Nancy Tsai is a 4th year postdoctoral research fellow at McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT where she collaborates with cross-functional teams to translate cognitive neuroscience research to inform the development of learning products/programs. Her expertise is on the effects of stress on prefrontal development and function (e.g. Executive Functions). She teaches graduate level coursework at Harvard Graduate School of Education and at MIT, and collaborates with outside organizations such as Accenture and UNICEF to translate cutting edge cognitive neuroscience research to real world application. 



Links from this episode:

https://fielddaylab.wisc.edu/play/shadowspect/

https://playful.mit.edu/

About NSF programs including Cyberlearning: https://beta.nsf.gov/funding/opportunities/research-emerging-technologies-teaching-and-learning

Game-Based Assessment: The Past Ten Years and Moving Forward: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/337038333_Game-Based_Assessment_The_Past_Ten_Years_and_Moving_Forward


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