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The Longship that could help save the planet

Season 1, Ep. 3

Everyone knows there’s just too much carbon dioxide in the atmosphere — and we’re heating up the planet at an unprecedented pace.  

 More than 20 years ago, Norwegians helped pioneer an approach to dealing with CO2  that’s still ongoing today— they captured it and pumped it into a rock formation deep under the sea.  

 Now the Norwegian government is building on those decades of experience with a large-scale carbon capture and storage project called Longship.  

 Will it work? Is it safe? And is it something that other countries can benefit from, too? 

 Our guests for this episode were Olav BollandPhilip Ringrose and Mona Mølnvik. 

 You can find the transcript of the episode here.


More resources/reading:  

 Olav Bolland’s book: 

Nord, Lars O.; Bolland, Olav. (2020) Carbon Dioxide Emission Management in Power Generation. Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft. 2020. ISBN 978-3-527-34753-7. 

 You can read the White Paper from the Norwegian government about the Longship project here

 Here’s a press release from 15 December 2020 that reports on the Norwegian Storting’s funding approval for the Longship project

 This link takes you to a transcript, in English, from the press conference from 21 September 2020 in which Norwegian officials announce the Longship plan. 

 Here’s the official website for the Longship CCS project. 

 You can read about the Norwegian CCS Research Centre that Mona Mølnvik is head of here. 

 An older, but still good video about Sleipner  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KG5_WSXj1pI&t=271s 

  Philip Ringrose’s group’s most recent video 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAAb1S4bqks&t=28s 

  A e-lecture by Philip Ringrose about CCS 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eozVdrvejDs&t=400s 

  

 Selected popular science and scientific articles 

 If the world can capture carbon, there’s capacity to store it. Norwegian SciTech News, 13 December 2019 

 The world doesn’t realise how much we need CO2 storage. Norwegian SciTech News, 5 December 2016 

 Carbon capture and storage essential to reach climate target. Norwegian SciTech News, 7 April 2014

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2013-09-20/norway-drops-moon-landing-as-mongstad-carbon-capture-scrapped 


 Ringrose, Philip; Meckel, T A. (2019) Maturing global CO2 storage resources on offshore continental margins to achieve 2DS emissions reductions.Scientific Reports. 9 (1). 

 Grethe Tangen, Erik G.B. Lindeberg, Arvid Nøttvedt, Svein Eggen. (2014) 

Large-scale Storage of CO2 on the Norwegian Shelf Enabling CCS Readiness in Europe, Energy Procedia, vol. 51, pp.326-333 

 Mai Bui, Claire S. Adjiman, Andre Bardow et al. (2018) Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS): the way forward. Energy Environ. Sci . 11, 1062 

From the summary for policymakers, IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5C (2018): 

 

“All pathways that limit global warming to 1.5°C with limited or no overshoot project the use of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) on the order of 100–1000 GtCO2 over the 21st century. CDR would be used to compensate for residual emissions and, in most cases, achieve net negative emissions to return global warming to 1.5°C following a peak (high confidence). CDR deployment of several hundreds of GtCO2 is subject to multiple feasibility and sustainability constraints (high confidence). Significant near-term emissions reductions and measures to lower energy and land demand can limit CDR deployment to a few hundred GtCO2 without reliance on bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) (high confidence).” 

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