Face2Face with David Peck

Share

Episode 452 - Joe Berridge and The Perfect City

Ep. 452

Joe Berridge and Face2Face host David Peck talk about cities and entropy, why they’re like purpose built machines, liberty, innovation, democracy and urban planning and why successful cities need immigrants.

 

About the Book:

There is no such thing as a perfect city, but great cities have moments of perfection - perfect streets or buildings, perfect places to raise a family or to relax with a coffee - and all strive for perfection when they undertake grand civic projects revitalizing their downtowns or waterfronts, or building innovation hubs, airports, and arenas, or reforming their governance systems, or integrating streams of new immigrants.


Cities, more than ever, are the engines of our economies and the ecosystems in which our lives play out, which makes questions about the perfectibility of urban life all the more urgent. Joe Berridge, one of the world’s leading urban planners, takes us on an insider’s tour of some of the world’s largest and most diverse cities, from New York to London, Shanghai to Singapore, Toronto to Sydney, Manchester to Belfast, to scrutinize what is working and what is not, what is promising and what needs to be fixed in the contemporary megalopolis.


We meet the people, politicians, and thinkers at the cutting edge of global city making, and share their struggles and successes as they balance the competing priorities of growing their economies, upgrading the urban machinery that keeps a city humming, and protecting, serving, and delighting their citizens. We visit a succession of great urban innovations, stop to eat in many of Joe’s favorite places, and leave with a startling view of the magical urban future that awaits us all.

 

About Joe:

 

Joe Berridge, a partner at Urban Strategies, is an urban planner and city builder who has had an integral role in the development of complex urban planning and regeneration projects in Canada, the U.S., the U.K., Europe and Asia. He has been strategic advisor for the development of the city centres of Manchester, Belfast and Cardiff and for the waterfronts of Toronto, Singapore, Sydney, Cork, London and Governors Island in New York City.

 

He has prepared campus master plans for the Universities of Manchester, Waterloo, Queen's and Western and is now advising on the new hub for Toronto Pearson International Airport. Joe teaches at the University of Toronto and is a Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy.

 

Image Copyright: Joe Berridge. Used with permission.


F2F Music and Image Copyright: David Peck and Face2Face. Used with permission.


For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.


With thanks to Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

More Episodes

7/11/2021

Identity, Uncertainty & Ego

Ep. 567
Nicole Dorsey and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Black Conflux, identity and uncertainty, empathy, attitude and ego, staying present, humility in asking good questions and why what you do next really matters.Watch the film now online.TrailerFind out more about Nicole and the film here.Synopsis:“The lives of an anxious teenage girl and a troubled man converge fatefully, in Nicole Dorsey’s vivid debut exploring womanhood and toxic masculinity.“Black Conflux is a constant visual delight.” –Stephen Dalton,The Hollywood ReporterSet in suburban Newfoundland in 1987, Nicole Dorsey’s debut feature is a dreamy account of two converging lives.Fifteen-year-old Jackie (Ella Ballentine) is navigating the tricky transition between vulnerable adolescence and impending adulthood. The film opens with Jackie auditioning for her school choir with a gorgeous rendition of “Hey, Who Really Cares?”, by obscure early-’70s psychedelic folk singer Linda Perhacs. It’s a symbolic overture for a promising young woman from a broken home. Raised by her aunt and living under the cloud of all the disappointments endured by the women in her family, Jackie finds herself giving in to internal and external pressures — partying, skipping school, and hitchhiking — in search of her own identity. Her choices leave her speeding inevitably towards Dennis (Ryan McDonald), a socially inept loner with a volatile dark streak and delusional fantasies of adoring women at his beck and call.Black Confluxis a vibrant and stunning debut, one that shies away from conventions common to small-town coming-of-age stories. Dorsey exhibits an inspiring cinematic style — both assured and mature — as she reflects on the past and her own experience. Exploring womanhood, isolation, and toxic masculinity,Black Confluxis a bracingly relevant narrative for today.”With thanks to Ravi Srinivasan and TIFFAbout Nicole:Nicole Dorsey is a Canadian film director and screenwriter, whose debut feature film, Black Conflux, premiered at the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival.The film was subsequently named to TIFF's annual year-end Canada's Top Ten list for 2019, and received a nomination for the John Dunning Best First Feature Award at the 8th Canadian Screen Awards in 2020.A native of Burlington, Ontario, she is a graduate of the film studies program at Ryerson University. She directed a number of short films prior to Black Conflux, including Ivadelle (2009), Pop the Grapes (2013), Dennis (2015), Star Princess (2015) and Arlo Alone (2018).Image Copyright and Credit: Nicole Dorsey and Band With Productions.F2F Music and Image Copyright:David PeckandFace2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visithis site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage andMixed Media Sound.
7/6/2021

Propaganda, History & Racial Justice

Ep. 565
CJ Hunt and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his film The Neutral Ground, memory and racial justice, rewriting history, propaganda, troubling stories we tell and why it’s time to be honest, out loud and in public.TrailerFind out more about CJ and the film here and you can watch the film here on PBS and through WNED in Canada.Synopsis:An official selection of the 2021 Tribeca Film Festival, The Neutral Groundbegins in 2015 as Hunt documents a raucous New Orleans City Council meeting about the removal of four Confederate monuments. It quickly becomes apparent just how divided white and Black residents are on the meaning of the city's statues. This tension between what to Hunt seems obvious – that the statues should be removed – and the fervor with which so many people oppose this view opens an opportunity for him to try and understand the mythology of the Confederacy and why Americans are willing to put so much on the line to guard its stone remnants.When death threats halt the removals in New Orleans, Hunt hits the road, travelling across the South to try and understand why a losing army from 1865 still holds so much political and imaginative power in contemporary America.Executive producer Roy Wood Jr. notes, “This film tells the story of people courageously dragging this nation into a promising and progressive conversation about racial reckoning. It’s also the story of those who refuse to admit that this reckoning has arrived." Raised in Birmingham, Alabama, a correspondent onThe Daily Show with Trevor Noahand known as one of the country's most incisive comedians on issues of race, Wood continues, "CJ’s approach to this topic ties into a much larger question facing America: How do we heal this nation’s deepest wounds when there are still so many people who won’t acknowledge those wounds exist?”About CJ:A comedian and filmmaker living in NYC, CJ is currently a field producer on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. He has also served as a staff writer for A&E's Black and White, and a field producer for BET's The Rundown with Robin Thede.Before working in late night, CJ spent nine years living in New Orleans where - in 2015 - he began filming what he thought would be a quick and easy confederate monument removal.CJ is an alumnus of Firelight Media's Doc Lab and New Orleans Film Festival's Emerging Voices program. He is also a 2020 New America Fellow and a regular host of The Moth.A graduate from Brown University's Africana Studies department, CJ is endlessly fascinated by race and comedy's ability to say what we can't.Image Copyright and Credit:CJ HuntF2F Music and Image Copyright:David PeckandFace2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visithis site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage andMixed Media Sound.
6/14/2021

Guns, Fact & Fake News

Ep. 564
Marc Silver and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his film 3.5 minutes, cities designed to separate, bridge building, racism, gun violence, fact versus fake news, vertical learning curves and justice through storytelling.TrailerFind out more about Marc here and stream the film here.Synopsis:Black Friday 2012: four boys in a red SUV pull into a gas station after spending time at the mall buying sneakers and talking to girls. With music blaring, one boy exits the car and enters the store, a quick stop for a soda and a pack of gum.A man and a woman pull up next to the boys in the station, making a stop for a bottle of wine. The woman enters the store, and an argument breaks out when the driver of the second car asks the boys to turn the music down.3½minutesand ten bullets later, one of the boys is dead.About Marc:Marc Silver is an award-winning filmmaker and director of the Oscar shortlisted and Emmy nominated feature doc, 3 ½ Minutes, Ten Bullets. It premiered at the Sundance Festival 2015 winning the U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Social Impact.His first feature length film Who is Dayani Cristal? premiered at the Sundance Festival 2013, where it won the Cinematography Award: World Cinema Documentary and the Amnesty International Best Documentary Award 2014.In 2017 his third feature length film To End A War about the peace process with theFARCwas released in Colombia.From 2018-20 Marc has been embedded inside Amnesty International researching ideas related to future technologies and their impact on human rights. The work has led to a short film about the profound gene editing toolCRIPSR, as well as a series of ideas with Shoshana Zuboff, author of The Age Of Surveillance Capitalism, and Christopher Wylie who whistle blew the Cambridge Analytica/Facebook story.He is completing his latest feature length documentary The World Is Forest in spring 2021.Image Copyright and Credit:Motto Pictures and Candescent Films.F2F Music and Image Copyright:David PeckandFace2Face. Used with permission.For more information about David Peck’s podcasting, writing and public speaking please visithis site here.With thanks to Josh Snethlage andMixed Media Sound.