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The global fallout of the war in Ukraine

Hundreds of thousands of Russians have fled their country since Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine in February. With open dissent to the president’s regime almost impossible, many opposition activists have fled to neighbouring Georgia.


Katie Stallard in Washington DC and Alix Kroeger in London speak to Ido Vock, who has been reporting from the Georgian capital, Tbilisi, about its status as a growing hub for the opposition in exile, the threats activists face, and their prospects of return.

 

Next, the team turn to the influence of powerful Russians in London and the questions around Boris Johnson’s links to Alexander and Evgeny Lebedev. Alexander is a former KGB agent and oligarch, now a British citizen; Evgeny, his son, owns the Evening Standard.


Then in You Ask us, a listener asks what happens if Russia cuts off gas supplies to Germany.


If you have a You Ask Us question for the international team, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk.


Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.


Further reading:


Katie Stallard writes that Russia is bluffing about its success in the war – but so is Ukraine


Ido Vock reports from Georgia, which is now a hub for Russian opposition in exile.


“Boris Johnson’s secret conversations with Alexander Lebedev raise serious concerns”: Alix Kroeger interviews Christopher Steele


Ido on what happens if Russia doesn’t turn Germany’s gas back on


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