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Working It

When loyal workers are bad for business

Season 2, Ep. 61

Most people think of loyalty as a good thing, but in a professional context, being too devoted to an employer can have damaging consequences. Disengaged workers who don’t leave their jobs will hardly make the best ambassadors for a company; longstanding employees might run out of fresh ideas; and some research shows loyal employees are less likely to cover up wrongdoing at their firms. Isabel Berwick speaks to Jeremie Brecheisen, Gallup’s managing partner for the Emea region, about the company’s annual ‘State of the Workplace’ report, which showed more than half of employees worldwide are looking to change jobs. Isabel also speaks to FT management editor Anjli Raval, about the downsides of workplace loyalty.


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Why staff loyalty is not always a good thing

Too much loyalty does neither the company nor the employee much good


Presented by Isabel Berwick, produced by Mischa Frankl-Duval, mixed by Simon Panayi. The executive producer is Manuela Saragosa. Cheryl Brumley is the FT’s head of audio.


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com

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