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Working It

‘Overboarding’: the perils of sitting on too many boards

Season 2, Ep. 1

There's shareholder pressure not to allow directors to take on too many board seats at once, something that’s been called ‘overboarding’. Non-executive directors can now find themselves voted off a board by investors if they believe a director is spreading themselves too thinly to do a good job. So how many board positions is too many? Host Isabel Berwick hears from the FT’s management editor Anjli Raval and corporate governance expert Patricia Lenkov in the US, while the FT’s careers expert Jonathan Black has advice on what’s required to be a good board member. 


Want more?

‘Overboarding’: why it has become a hot issue for companies

https://www.ft.com/content/c1aeaa21-1361-492d-a63d-d14d7c1a481d

How do I become a non-executive director?

https://www.ft.com/content/642cc2e5-c04c-4075-9978-03eb6eb44fca


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Presented by Isabel Berwick. Produced by Manuela Saragosa and Audrey Tinline. The sound engineer is Breen Turner.


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com

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