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cover art for Tarzana The Wild Girl (Tarzana, sesso selvaggio, Guido Malatesta, 1969)

Wild, Wild Podcast

Tarzana The Wild Girl (Tarzana, sesso selvaggio, Guido Malatesta, 1969)

Season 6, Ep. 4

For the final time, pack your mosquito spray and come with us into the fake jungles of Rome's film studios in search of a mythical white goddess who has the kind of sex appeal that even the animals can dig. Yes, it's Tarzana, the beautiful heiress whose parents died in the plane crash that left her alone in Kenya to survive and thrive, learning such essential jungle skills as how to swing on vines, how to direct elephants, and how to weave tiny thongs.


In the episode we discuss the lack of available interviews with star Ken Clark. Rod mentions some videos, but on post-episode examination it turns out these are interviews with British politician Ken Clarke. However, the fanzine European Trash Cinema did interview our Ken back in 1995. You can find part of that interview reproduced HERE. If you want to read the whole thing, the issue is currently for sale on eBay.


The only decent online coverage of Tarzana can be found on the blog Spinning Image.


We hope you have enjoyed this jungle-themed mini-season. We would love to hear from you if you have any favourite Jungle Girl films, or if you ever got lost in the jungle yourself and ended up befriending the animals or becoming a god to a local tribe. You can contact us on Twitter and Instagram or by email at wildwildpodcast@gmail.com. Please also remember to rate and review us on your podcast platform of choice!


If you enjoy the podcast, why not buy us a coffee at ko-fi.com/wildwildpodcast? Espresso, naturally. Grazie mille!

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