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cover art for Fashion's Response to War in Ukraine - A Conversation with Vogue Ukraine's Venya Brykalin

WARDROBE CRISIS with Clare Press

Fashion's Response to War in Ukraine - A Conversation with Vogue Ukraine's Venya Brykalin

Season 7, Ep. 159

On February 24th, Russia invaded Ukraine. The news headlines filled with terrifying stories of missile strikes on residential areas, hitting apartment buildings and killing civilians; of nuclear power plants being attacked and 1 million people fleeing country. What has fashion to do with all this?


The morning that Russian President Vladimir Putin declared war was also the first day of Milan Fashion Week. And as the violence continued, so too did the fashion shows, next in Paris. Fashion’s Instagram feeds were unsettling mix of commentary on Kim Kardashian’s outfits and blue-and-yellow street style looks inspired by the Ukrainian flag. Some brands used their platforms to take a stand for peace. But solidarity only goes so far.


How should fashion respond to war? What is our moral obligation? Saying you care about something is not the same as doing something about it, so beyond a social media post, how can an industry like fashion contribute meaningfully? Should brands the retailers impose their own sanctions on Russia and halt business there? What support do Ukrainian designers need? Is it okay not to speak out? And when does this become simply, as guest today puts it, common sense, or an expression of our common humanity.


In this week’s Episode, Clare sits down with Venya Brykalin, fashion director of Vogue Ukraine to ask these questions and more.


Want to help Ukraine? Please visit this website: https://how-to-help-ukraine-now.super.site/


Thank you for listening. As usual, find further links and details on the shownotes on thewardrobecrisis.com


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