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Tyson Yunkaporta on indigenous thinking and why you can't improve your "self"

Season 1, Ep. 6

In this episode... 

We speak with Tyson Yunkaporta about indigenous thinking and why paying attention to pattern and context matters. Tyson is an indigenous academic, researcher and carver of traditional tools and weapons. 

Who is Tyson Yunkaporta?

Tyson Yunkaporta is an indigenous academic, researcher and member of the Apalech Clan in far north Queensland. He works as a senior lecturer in Indigenous Knowledges at Deakin University in Melbourne and also carves traditional tools and weapons.  

Tyson is the author of Sand Talk: How indigenous thinking can save the world, in which he uses sand talk, which honours the Aboriginal custom of drawing images on the ground, to bring clarity to complexity. He asks: what happens if we bring an indgenous perspective to the big picture - to history, education, money, power? Can we, in fact, have proper concepts of sustainable life without Indigenous Knowledge?

Tyson is also the host of The Other Others podcast, in which hosts wide ranging and always paradigm-cracking yarns with a diverse bunch of thinkers and doers.

You can also follow Tyson’s work at LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tyson-yunkaporta-04a9b969/

A few things you’ll learn about in this episode

  • How humans are contextual beings and how our cognition depends on context, relationality, place and story.
  • How the best outcomes can’t be planned.
  • Why attention and responsiveness to the pattern of relations you live within is important
  • How the indigenous idea of wisdom or knowledge is so closely related to listening/observing, and what that means for those too married to a specific outcomes.

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We hope you enjoyed this episode. We'd love to hear what you think. Get in touch with us via our website, LinkedIn or Facebook, if you’d like to say hello, dish out some high praise, or suggest a guest for the show.

Episode keywords

Culture, complexity, leadership, sensemaking, indigenous knowledge, indigenous wisdom, systems thinking, pattern mind

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