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The Intelligence from The Economist

The Intelligence: Ukraine’s war, two years on

In this roundtable discussion our editors examine how the past year has progressed, discuss how things may go over the next year and consider a few fundamentally positive truths about the whole conflict. Meanwhile our senior producer travels through Ukraine, getting a measure of both determination and despondency among soldiers and civilians.


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  • The Intelligence: Your country needs you!

    23:53
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  • The Intelligence: He said, she fled

    22:16
    All over the world, young men are identifying more with the political right, even as women drift more to the left. What is behind the gulf, and how to close it? The seeming drop in crime in Naples is not because the notorious mafia activity has disappeared—it has evolved (10:11). And exploring the history and the present of the flat white (17:08).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
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    26:01
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  • The Intelligence: A region holds its breath

    26:35
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  • The Weekend Intelligence: Everything my Mum left behind

    38:23
    In January, Economist correspondent Rosie Blau’s mum died. She left behind a houseful of possessions, accumulated over a lifetime. Items suffused with memories, items catalogued as useful - in a rainy day kind of way - and items, like toenail clippings and broken tennis rackets, that had no utility at all. In the months since her death, Rosie has been sorting through her mum’s house. The reality and enormity of the task has left her reflecting on her mum’s relationship with stuff and why she kept so much of it.Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
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    24:17
    Since the invasion began, Ukraine's second city has suffered a third of all aerial attacks. The latest one has been especially gruelling. A census of Mexico’s missing people is likely underestimating the scale of the problem. Is the president deliberately trying to minimise its scale (11:08)? And, why those with the least to spend on lottery tickets are most likely to try their luck (19:20). Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • The Intelligence: Can Japan and America Trump-proof their alliance?

    21:02
    The leaders of both countries will meet for dinner at the White House tonight. In light of Asia’s changing geopolitics, defence will certainly be high up on the agenda. Somali pirates are wreaking havoc in the Indian Ocean again. What explains their resurgence (8:34)? And, have a listen to what AI can do with music (13:29). Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.