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cover art for The Intelligence: eyewitness to slaughter in Sudan

The Intelligence from The Economist

The Intelligence: eyewitness to slaughter in Sudan

Our correspondent speaks with the Africa head of the Red Cross who has borne witness to the war, famine and genocide that continue—unrelenting and largely ignored—in Sudan. As Ukraine’s men are sent off to war, the country’s women are upending its labour market; we meet some newly minted miners (10:07). And how the age at which careers peak is changing (18:34).

 

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