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Rocketing science: China’s newest superpower

After decades as a scientific also-ran, China is becoming a superpower particularly in the physical sciences. We examine the risks and opportunities that poses for the West. Our correspondent looks into why denizens of the Mediterranean live so long (10.32). And this year’s confluence of two broods makes for a rare preponderance of cicadas (17.53).


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