Share

cover art for Money Talks: The business of survival

Money Talks from The Economist

Money Talks: The business of survival

With countries accounting for more than half of global GDP in lockdown, the collapse of commercial activity is unprecedented. Falling demand and a bitter price war had pushed the price of crude oil to its lowest since 1999. Could a historic deal between oil producers be enough to stabilise the market? Plus, those companies that survive the coronavirus crisis will have to adapt to a very different environment. And, how to reopen factories after covid-19. Patrick Lane hosts 


For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.

 

And please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/radiooffer

More episodes

View all episodes

  • Dangerous allure: Why the China model still appeals overseas

    38:01
    China’s model for economic development holds serious appeal for countries looking for an alternative to the Washington consensus of economic and political liberalisation. But what exactly is the “China Model”? And should America and its allies be worried about China’s growing confidence in exporting it?Hosts: Mike Bird and Tom Lee-Devlin. Guests: Elizabeth Economy, Hargrove senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University; and Yasheng Huang, Professor of Global Economic and Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcasts.Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • Music machines: Could AI kill the radio star?

    40:13
    More than 100,000 tracks are added to Spotify every day. A growing share of them are now generated by AI. That sounds like bad news for artists, as well as the businesses that rely on them. So what does the music industry look like in the age of AI?Hosts: Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird. Guests: Andy Mooney, CEO of Fender and Michael Nash, chief digital officer at Universal Music GroupTranscripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcasts.Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • Trailer: The Modi Raj

    04:58
    Narendra Modi is one of the most popular politicians on the planet. India’s prime minister is eyeing a third term atop the world’s biggest democracy. A tea-seller’s son, Mr Modi began life an outsider and the man behind the political phenomenon remains hard to fathom. India has become an economic powerhouse during his ten years in charge. But he’s also the frontman for a chauvinistic Hindu nationalist dogma. Can Mr Modi continue to balance both parts of his agenda and finish the job of turning India into a superpower? The Economist’s Avantika Chilkoti finds out what makes him tick. Launching June 2024.To listen to the full series, subscribe to Economist Podcasts+.If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • Baby doomers: Should you worry about falling birth rates?

    42:16
    Across the developed world, birth rates are tumbling. That poses a fiscal threat: a smaller working-age population will struggle to fund pensions and health care for a growing number of old folk. In the face of a sudden shortfall of babies, governments face a problem: how do you incentivise people to have more kids?Hosts: Mike Bird, Alice Fulwood and Tom Lee-Devlin. Guests: anthropologist Ayo Wahlberg and The Economist’s Cerian Richmond Jones.To hear more on this topic, listen to our Drum Tower podcast on why China’s one-child policy is still having an impact on the country’s birth rate.Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcastsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks Get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • New order: The global financial order is under threat

    45:32
    Today’s global financial system is dominated by the dollar and depends on Western capital, institutions and payment networks. A number of forces are now combining to reduce the system’s reliance on this financial plumbing, and on America in particular. Those who resent the country for using its control over the global financial system to impose its will through sanctions want to cut the superpower out. As US-China tensions increase, is the stage set for a split into separate financial systems?Hosts: Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird. Guests: Art Karoonyavanich, head of equity capital markets at DBS, Singapore's biggest bank; Adam Szubin, former Acting Under Secretary at the US Treasury; and Eswar Prasad, Tolani Senior Professor of Trade Policy at Cornell University.Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcastsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks Get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • A wholesale success: Why Americans love Costco

    38:47
    Costco is the world’s third-biggest retailer, after Amazon and Walmart. What sets it apart from its competitors is the peculiar adoration it seems to inspire from shoppers. And it’s not just Costco cardholders who love the wholesaler. Wall Street analysts fawn over the stock. Though the retailer’s sales are less than half of Walmart’s, its return on capital, at nearly 20%, is more than twice as high. What is behind Costco’s enduring success?Hosts: Alice Fulwood, Mike Bird and Tom Lee-Devlin. Guests: Costco superfans David and Susan Schwartz; and Joe Feldman, an analyst at Telsey Advisory Group.Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcastsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks Get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • Money Talks: Can the Singapore miracle continue?

    45:13
    Singapore is about to get a new prime minister: Lawrence Wong. Only three people have previously held the job since the country gained independence from Malaysia almost 60 years ago—and they have overseen what is nothing short of an economic miracle. The city-state surfed the wave of globalisation and became wealthy in the process. But the tide may be turning on a more open world—and open markets. Can Mr Wong maintain the country’s success?Hosts: Mike Bird, Alice Fulwood and Tom Lee-Devlin. Guests: The Economist’s Patrick Foulis and Lawrence Wong.Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcastsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalksListen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology— subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • Money Talks: An interview with Joseph Stiglitz

    40:28
    For decades, the Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz looked like an outsider in his field. As the world opened up to trade in the 1990s, the former chair of Bill Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisors and Chief Economist for the World Bank grew disillusioned, eventually becoming one of the most prominent critics of globalisation. Now Joe Biden is pulling back from unfettered trade with China and has turned to massive subsidies in an effort to reindustrialise America. So is Joseph Stiglitz finally having his moment?Hosts: Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird. Guests: Joseph StiglitzSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • Money Talks: How much worse can US-China relations get?

    39:42
    It’s been more than twenty years since China joined the World Trade Organisation and integrated itself fully into the world trading system. Back then, there was enthusiastic and bipartisan support for trade with China in Washington. That alliance in favour of liberalisation has now been transformed into a consensus that America’s trade relations with China are far too close. So where is the US-China trade war heading next?Hosts: Mike Bird and Tom Lee-Devlin. Guests: Dr Keyu Jin, associate professor of economics at the London School of Economics and author of “The New China Playbook”; and Michael Stumo, CEO of the Coalition for a Prosperous America.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.