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cover art for Money Talks picks: Would you rather be a manager or a leader?

Money Talks from The Economist

Money Talks picks: Would you rather be a manager or a leader?

An article from The Economist read aloud. Our Bartleby column, on work and management, finds that the distinction between a leader and a manager is both valid and unhelpful

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  • Holding the baby: the motherhood penalty

    44:48
    The gender pay gap stubbornly persists across the rich world, with women still earning less than men despite decades of campaigning, equal rights legislation and changing cultural norms. The academic consensus has largely blamed the “motherhood penalty”—the fact that women still tend to bear the brunt of child-rearing responsibilities. But new research is challenging that view.Hosts: Alice Fulwood, Tom Lee-Devlin and Mike Bird. Guests: Marianne Bertrand, professor of economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business; Erik Plug, professor of economics at the University of Amsterdam; and The Economist’s Christian Odendahl.Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcasts.Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+.For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • Palaver in Paris: will politics derail France’s commercial revival?

    42:10
    Last month Mistral AI, a tech start-up based in Paris, raised €600m in funding, valuing it at nearly €6bn. The deal was emblematic of the French capital’s astonishing commercial revival since the pro-business Emmanuel Macron became president seven years ago. But on Sunday that revival was thrown into doubt as snap elections produced a hung parliament, robbing Mr Macron’s party of control. Could the resulting political turmoil, and rising support for the far right, undermine business confidence and snuff out Paris’s renaissance?Hosts: Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood, and Mike Bird. Guests: Ludovic Subran, chief economist at insurance company Allianz; Cedric O, co-founder of Mistral AI; and The Economist’s Paris bureau chief, Sophie Pedder.Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcasts.Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • The Bangalore model: Could developing countries get rich by exporting services?

    41:05
    Companies from Amazon to Intel are relocating entire departments to developing countries, where they can tap into a rich seam of highly-skilled workers at much lower wages, to do everything from HR to microchip design. It’s part of an accelerating trend since the covid-19 pandemic, which made clear to employers that tens of millions of service-sector jobs could potentially be done remotely from anywhere in the world.So what does this mean for developing countries? Could service exports be a way for the likes of India, the Philippines and South Africa to get rich in the 21st century, in the same way that Korea, Taiwan and China did with manufacturing exports over the last century? And if so, what will it mean for service-sector workers in the developed world?Hosts: Mike Bird, Alice Fulwood and Arjun Ramani. Guests: Vikram Ahuja, co-founder of ANSR, a company that sets up global capability centres in India; and Richard Baldwin, professor of international economics at the IMD Business School in SwitzerlandTranscripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcasts.Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. ____________________
  • Eye of the beholder: the opaque world of the art market

    41:24
    In 2017, Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi sold at auction for $450 million. Meanwhile, a poster reprint would have set you back $10. Why are a small number of super-wealthy buyers willing to pay such huge sums for the right pieces? It’s a question that is becoming more widely relevant, as new art investment funds seek to open this murky and unregulated market up to the broader public. So how much does the value of your investment depend on the whims of a handful of galleries and collectors? And how can you even be sure what you’re buying is authentic? Hosts: Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood, and Mike Bird. Guests: Noah Horowitz, CEO of the Art Basel international art fair; Lars Nittve, investment committee chair at Arte Collectum; Orlando Whitfield, an art dealer, author, and former friend of Inigo Philbrick, who committed the biggest art fraud in history; and The Economist’s Jon Fasman.Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcasts.Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • In a tailspin: what will it take to turn Boeing around?

    37:17
    Boeing’s business is a mess, following two plane crashes in 2018-19 and a string of safety scares. The aerospace manufacturer has not received a single 737 Max order in two months. The FAA has imposed a production go-slow on safety grounds. The share price is down 60%. And the departing CEO Dave Calhoun was hauled before Congress earlier this week to apologise for the 346 deaths he acknowledged the company was responsible for. What can Mr Calhoun’s eventual successor do to bring Boeing out of its nosedive?Hosts: Alice Fulwood, Tom Lee-Devlin, and Mike Bird. Guests: Ed Pierson, founder of the Foundation for Aviation Safety; Peter Robison, author of “Flying Blind: The 737 MAX Tragedy and the Fall of Boeing”; Ron Epstein, an aerospace and defence analyst at Bank of America; and The Economist’s Simon Wright.Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcasts.Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • Dangerous allure: Why the China model still appeals overseas

    38:01
    China’s model for economic development holds serious appeal for countries looking for an alternative to the Washington consensus of economic and political liberalisation. But what exactly is the “China Model”? And should America and its allies be worried about China’s growing confidence in exporting it?Hosts: Mike Bird and Tom Lee-Devlin. Guests: Elizabeth Economy, Hargrove senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University; and Yasheng Huang, Professor of Global Economic and Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcasts.Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • Music machines: Could AI kill the radio star?

    40:13
    More than 100,000 tracks are added to Spotify every day. A growing share of them are now generated by AI. That sounds like bad news for artists, as well as the businesses that rely on them. So what does the music industry look like in the age of AI?Hosts: Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird. Guests: Andy Mooney, CEO of Fender and Michael Nash, chief digital officer at Universal Music GroupTranscripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcasts.Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • Trailer: The Modi Raj

    04:58
    Narendra Modi is one of the most popular politicians on the planet. India’s prime minister is eyeing a third term atop the world’s biggest democracy. A tea-seller’s son, Mr Modi began life an outsider and the man behind the political phenomenon remains hard to fathom. India has become an economic powerhouse during his ten years in charge. But he’s also the frontman for a chauvinistic Hindu nationalist dogma. Can Mr Modi continue to balance both parts of his agenda and finish the job of turning India into a superpower? The Economist’s Avantika Chilkoti finds out what makes him tick. Launching June 2024.To listen to the full series, subscribe to Economist Podcasts+.If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.
  • Baby doomers: Should you worry about falling birth rates?

    42:16
    Across the developed world, birth rates are tumbling. That poses a fiscal threat: a smaller working-age population will struggle to fund pensions and health care for a growing number of old folk. In the face of a sudden shortfall of babies, governments face a problem: how do you incentivise people to have more kids?Hosts: Mike Bird, Alice Fulwood and Tom Lee-Devlin. Guests: anthropologist Ayo Wahlberg and The Economist’s Cerian Richmond Jones.To hear more on this topic, listen to our Drum Tower podcast on why China’s one-child policy is still having an impact on the country’s birth rate.Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcastsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks Get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.