The Week in Art

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Saving the art world’s self-employed

This week, we explore the devastating effects of the coronavirus (Covid-19) on art communities, and particularly the wealth of self-employed workers in the art world. We hear about the support packages for people working in the visual arts in Germany, we discuss the precarious position of artists in the UK and we hear about a petition highlighting the fact that galleries in New York and their teams of workers may not benefit from the relief initiatives for small businesses recently announced by the New York mayor Bill de Blasio. Plus, we have the latest in our new series in which focus on works behind the doors of museums that have closed due to the coronavirus, this week with Zoe Whitley, the new director of the Chisenhale Gallery in London. Whitley discusses a springtime gem from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Alma Thomas's Wind and Crepe Myrtle Concerto (1973).


More Episodes

12/10/2021

Walt Disney at The Met. Plus, Matisse in Baltimore and Josef Albers's lithographs

This week: the French decorative art that inspired Walt Disney, Henri Matisse’s collaboration over 40 years with the Baltimore art collector Etta Cone, and Josef Albers’s prints.The Art Newspaper’s deputy digital editor, Aimee Dawson speaks to Wolf Burchard, a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, about Inspiring Walt Disney: The Animation of French Decorative Arts, which opens today, 10 December and travels next year to the Wallace Collection, London. As the Baltimore Museum of Art opens its new Ruth R. Marder Center for Matisse Studies, with around 2,500-square-feet of space dedicated to the research and display of the art of Henri Matisse, on 12 December, Ben Luke discusses the French artist’s special relationship with the Baltimore-based collector Etta Cone, which is the foundation of the museum’s huge collection of Matisse’s works in all media. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, the gallerist Alan Cristea talks about Josef Albers’s Graphic Tectonic lithographs, and their relationship to his wider printmaking activity and his celebrated Homage to the Square series, as a show of Albers’s early- and mid-career prints opens at Cristea Roberts in London.Inspiring Walt Disney: The Animation of French Decorative Arts, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 10 December-6 March 2022; Wallace Collection, London, 6 April-16 October 2022. Our Work of the Week featuring The Swing by Fragonard, from 5 November.The Ruth R. Marder Center for Matisse Studies opens on 12 December. A Modern Influence: Henri Matisse, Etta Cone, and Baltimore, Baltimore Museum of Art, until 2 January 2022.Josef Albers: Discovery and Invention, The Early Graphic Works, Cristea Roberts, London 10 December-22 January (gallery closed 20 December-3 January). Anni and Josef Albers: Art and Life, Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (MAM), Paris, until 9 January.
12/3/2021

Art Basel in Miami Beach and the story of art fairs. Plus, Caribbean-British art, and Marco Brambilla's VR work

This week, as Art Basel in Miami Beach opens, we discuss a new book, The Art Fair Story: A Rollercoaster Ride, with its author Melanie Gerlis, art market columnist at the Financial Times and editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper. Melanie ponders the past, present and future of art fairs. A huge new show, Life Between Islands: Caribbean-British Art 1950s-Now has just opened at Tate Britain in London, and we talk to its curators, Alex Farquharson, the director of Tate Britain, and David A Bailey, the artistic director of the International Curators Forum and the organiser of numerous seminal exhibitions on diaspora and Black representation in art. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we’re back in Miami—our deputy digital editor Aimee Dawson talks to the artist Marco Brambilla about Heaven’s Gate, his new virtual reality work at the Pérez Art Museum.The Art Fair Story: A Rollercoaster Ride by Melanie Gerlis is published by Lund Humphries and priced £19.99 in the UK, $34.99 in the US and $46.99 in Canada.Life Between Islands: Caribbean-British Art, 1950s-Now is at Tate Britain until 3 April 2022. David A Bailey’s book with Allison Thompson, Liberation Begins in the Imagination—an anthology of writings on Caribbean-British art and culture—is also published by Tate and priced £30.Marco Brambilla: Heaven’s Gate is at the Pérez Art Museum Miami until 1 February next year. An in-depth review of Heaven’s Gate by The Art Newspaper’s XR Panel can be found at theartnewspaper.com or on our apps for iOS and Android.