The Ralph Moore Podcast

9/24/2021

Matthew Anderson: Plant Utah Part 1 of 2

Season 3, Ep. 50311
Matthew Anderson broke the mold. Coming to Christ in his early twenties he was soon drafted as a youth pastor. Searching for direction, he turned away from the books that well-meaning friends showered onto him. Matthew asked, "What would Jesus do if he were a youth pastor?" And he found the answer to that question in the gospels and Acts. If Jesus were a youth pastor he would make disciples who make disciples. This idea was rejected by key elders in that church, though they've since done an about-face.Planting a business, he was self-sustaining while pastoring a bunch of kids. God interrupted that by calling him into paid ministry in a small rural church in the South. That too came to an end as a result of teaching Matthew 9 where Jesus asks us to pray for labor. In the teaching, he challenged his people to prayer-walk a locale, even if it meant traveling a significant distance. Afterward, he began to feel that God was calling him away from that church but to where he had no idea. His wife, Chandra, was getting the same signals. They spent a year in prayer during which they grew aware of the myriad unreached people groups in the United States. Eventually, they listed four groups in four locations where they might be useful. Matthew decided to take his own advice about traveling to a location to prayer-walk it. He chose the least appealing of the four which was Utah with its Mormon population. The flight included a "chance" meeting with a guy from North Carolina whose wife grew up in Utah. These people had prayed daily, for several years, that Jesus would send missionaries to Utah. They went nuts over meeting Matthew.The story gets more exciting than this, including his intentional bivocational role and how another chance meeting morphed into a church that has blossomed into a small movement of churches in a population where less than .5 percent are evangelical Christians. If you're interested in microchurch or making disciples you will find this interview exciting, frustrating and fulfilling all at once. You can connect with Matthew at plantutah.com.
9/17/2021

John Harris-What Does He Know That You Don't? 2 of 2

Season 3, Ep. 50310
What does John Harris know that you don’t?He’s grown a church from 2 people to 400 during Covid and on Facebook. But that’s not the most crucial part of this interview. Post-Church Christfollowers and “multimodal” church are.John left a career as a military chaplain to join the staff in a large California church. After more than a decade, he began noticing that most church dropouts come from among the 20 percent of super-committed Christ-followers. The doers and givers are leaving churches in significant numbers.So, in 2019 he departed his job as an executive pastor to launch a coaching ministry designed to help pastors keep their most influential members. Then Covid struck!Forced to move his business online, he never missed a beat. The coaching platform has grown in size and productivity but still left something to be explored. Seeking to understand better why key people leave the church, he decided to start an “unchurch” to reach them. He doesn’t call it that. I do. It presents as an “online Christian community.” Intent on avoiding the word, church, he began by reaching people who feel they just escaped one.Then there is the evangelism element. As people get excited about personal growth around the father-love of God, they talk about it. Evangelism happens without prodding. The story goes on. So you need to listen to it if you want to understand “multimodal church” or why I found myself coaching a church growth coach. You can learn about the coaching business at https://www.jharrischurchconsulting.com/ to check on the unchurch, you’ll need to take notes as he explains the path to observe what he’s doing in part 2 of this fascinating interview.
9/10/2021

John Harris-What Does He Know That You Don't? (1 of 2)

Season 3, Ep. 50309
What does John Harris know that you don’t?He’s grown a church from 2 people to 400 during Covid and on Facebook. But that’s not the most crucial part of this interview. Post-Church Christfollowers and “multimodal” church are.John left a career as a military chaplain to join the staff in a large California church. After more than a decade, he began noticing that most church dropouts come from among the 20 percent of super-committed Christ-followers. The doers and givers are leaving churches in significant numbers.So, in 2019 he departed his job as an executive pastor to launch a coaching ministry designed to help pastors keep their most influential members. Then Covid struck!Forced to move his business online, he never missed a beat. The coaching platform has grown in size and productivity but still left something to be explored. Seeking to understand better why key people leave the church, he decided to start an “unchurch” to reach them. He doesn’t call it that. I do. It presents as an “online Christian community.” Intent on avoiding the word, church, he began by reaching people who feel they just escaped one.Then there is the evangelism element. As people get excited about personal growth around the father-love of God, they talk about it. Evangelism happens without prodding. The story goes on. So you need to listen to it if you want to understand “multimodal church” or why I found myself coaching a church growth coach.You can learn about the coaching business at https://www.jharrischurchconsulting.com/ to check on the unchurch, you’ll need to take notes as he explains the path to observe what he’s doing in part 2 of this fascinating interview.
8/20/2021

Jarell Flowers: Freedom Music Group & Rise Microchurch Movement Part 3 of 3

Season 3, Ep. 50306
This is the third installment of a highly informative interview.Following a near-fatal car accident at age 17, pastor's son Jarrell Flowers got serious with Jesus. That set him on a path toward fruitfulness in the commercial music world as well as in ministry.He's involved in live concerts, music production and community engagement. His songs are featured in both mainstream and Christian markets. Jarrell aspires to make music that brings people together in a unique blend of hip hop, pop and rock music. He pioneered the Freedom Music Group as an indie network building artistic communities that make disciples of Jesus who intend to change the world.After a dark bout of depression, Jarrell put the word out through social media asking musicians and other artists if they felt isolated and in need of spiritual support. The response was immediately overwhelming. Over time a movement was born. Rise microchurch communities emerged from the mix. An interesting aspect of this interview is Jarrell's interest in whatever parallels might be found between the Jesus Movement of the 1970s and the renewed awareness of social and community needs facing younger people today. Rise communities are highly missional. One group of musicians has made it their job to provide an interface between a local police department and people living in the neighborhood. I came away impressed that this is not a movement of friends self-congratulating about their mutual interests. These people are out to bring Jesus into a broken world.You can learn more about Jarrell at freedommusicgroup.com. To connect with the Rise movement click on https://freedommusicgroup.com/riseconnect.
8/13/2021

Jarell Flowers: Freedom Music Group & Rise Microchurch Movement Part 2 of 3

Ep. 50305
This is the second part of a three-part interview. Following a near-fatal car accident at age 17, pastor's son Jarrell Flowers got serious with Jesus. That set him on a path toward fruitfulness in the commercial music world as well as in ministry.He's involved in live concerts, music production and community engagement. His songs are featured in both mainstream and Christian markets.Jarrell aspires to make music that brings people together in a unique blend of hip hop, pop and rock music. He pioneered the Freedom Music Group as an indienetwork building artistic communities that make disciples of Jesus who intend to change the world.After a dark bout of depression, Jarrell put the word out through social media asking musicians and other artists if they felt isolated and in need of spiritual support. The response was immediately overwhelming. Over time a movement was born. Rise microchurch communities emerged from the mix. An interesting aspect of this interview is Jarrell's interest in whatever parallels might be found between the Jesus Movement of the 1970s and the renewed awareness of social and community needs facing younger people today. Rise communities are highly missional. One group of musicians has madeit their job to provide an interface between a local police department and people living in the neighborhood. I came away impressed that this is nota movement of friends self-congratulating about their mutual interests. These people are out to bring Jesus into a broken world.You can learn more about Jarrell at freedommusicgroup.com. To connect with theRise movement click on https://freedommusicgroup.com/riseconnect.
8/6/2021

Jarell Flowers: Freedom Music Group & Rise Microchurch Movement Part 1 of 3

Season 3, Ep. 50304
Following a near-fatal car accident at age 17, pastor's son Jarrell Flowers got serious with Jesus. That set him on a path toward fruitfulness in the commercial music world as well as in ministry.He's involved in live concerts, music production and community engagement. His songs are featured in both mainstream and Christian markets. Jarrell aspires to make music that brings people together in a unique blend of hip hop, pop and rock music. He pioneered the Freedom Music Group as an indie network building artistic communities that make disciples of Jesus who intend to change the world.After a dark bout of depression, Jarrell put the word out through social media asking musicians and other artists if they felt isolated and in need of spiritual support. The response was immediately overwhelming. Over time a movement was born. Rise microchurch communities emerged from the mix. An interesting aspect of this interview is Jarrell's interest in whatever parallels might be found between the Jesus Movement of the 1970s and the renewed awareness of social and community needs facing younger people today. Rise communities are highly missional. One group of musicians has made it their job to provide an interface between a local police department and people living in the neighborhood. I came away impressed that this is not a movement of friends self-congratulating about their mutual interests. These people are out to bring Jesus into a broken world.You can learn more about Jarrell at freedommusicgroup.com. To connect with the Rise movement click on https://freedommusicgroup.com/riseconnect.