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The National Security Podcast

Women in National Security: Elise Stephenson, gender researcher and Fulbright Scholar

In this episode of the National Security Podcast, we bring you the sixth instalment of the Women in National Security mini-series, produced in collaboration with Accenture.


In this episode of the National Security Podcast, hosts Gai Brodtmann, National Security College Futures Council member, and Meg Tapia, Principal Director for Defence and National Security at Accenture, are joined by Dr Elise Stephenson, ANU National Security College Fellow and Research Fellow at the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership. Drawing on recent data, Elise discusses the barriers for women entering and progressing within the national security domain, and outlines the systemic issues that stand in the way of gender equality.

 

Dr Elise Stephenson is an ANU National Security College Fellow and Research Fellow at the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership. Elise seeks to find critical junctures across industries and portfolios – all for the sake of research, practice, or policy interventions that can help to ensure equality in various aspects of international affairs.


Gai Brodtmann is a member of the ANU National Security College (NSC)'s Futures Council having previously served as a diplomat, defence consultant, Member of Parliament, Shadow Assistant Minister for Cyber Security and Defence and Shadow Parliamentary Secretary for Defence.


Meg Tapia has 16 years of experience in national security and foreign policy. She served as a diplomat in Papua New Guinea, Afghanistan, and Vanuatu. Currently, Meg is Principal Director for Defence and National Security at Accenture.


We’re giving away several free tickets to the WiNS Live event, taking place on the 10 November in Canberra! If you’re a woman who is new to — or interested in joining — the national security community, enter now: https://forms.office.com/r/U0fashVrLE


All episodes of the Women in National Security mini-series are available here.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. We’d love to hear from you! Send in your questions, comments, and suggestions to NatSecPod@anu.edu.au. You can tweet us @NSC_ANU and be sure to subscribe so you don’t miss out on future episodes. The National Security Podcast is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotify, and wherever you get your podcasts. 

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