The National Security Podcast

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Balancing acts: unpacking Australia’s electronic surveillance law

In this episode of the National Security Podcast, Lizzie O’Shea and Dominique Dalla-Pozza join Will Stoltz to discuss the state of electronic surveillance in Australia – with a focus on two new powerful pieces of legislation.


Large parts of our lives are now conducted online, so naturally this domain has become an import source of intelligence and evidence for national security agencies. Parliament recently passed two important pieces of legislation that expand the powers of Australia’s security agencies to spy digitally. What impact will these laws have on the average citizen? And how will they help security agencies do their jobs? In this episode of the National Security Podcast, Will Stoltz chats to Lizzie O’Shea and Dominique Dalla-Pozza about these new laws and what impact they might have.


Lizzie O’Shea is a human rights lawyer specialising in public interest litigation. She is a founding member and Chair of Digital Rights Watch and the author of Future Histories.


Dr Dominique Dalla-Pozza is a senior lecturer at ANU College of Law working in the field of Australian public law. Her primary research deals with the Australian Parliament and the legislative process, especially the process by which Australian national security law is made.


Dr William Stoltz is the Senior Adviser for Public Policy at ANU National Security College (NSC). He is responsible for mobilising the College’s research and resident expertise to influence and inform current public policy debates.


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6/16/2022

Critical submarine cables: a deep dive into undersea infrastructure

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Development, conflict mitigation, and security for the Pacific

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‘Secret statecraft’ in the spotlight

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