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How to be prepared for a worst-case scenario: for individuals and businesses

Season 2, Ep. 5

In this episode of The Lens, our host Oli Barrett MBE talks to Stewart Steel, CEO of Sedgwick UK and Simon Crowther, Founder of Flood Protection Solutions. They discuss how both individuals and businesses can be better prepared, and how collaboration might just be the key element that’s missing. Oli also asks his guests about their personal career journeys and who they'd most like the opportunity to meet for coffee. Let's get to the conversation...


The Lens Reading List


po.st/wouldyoubeready


bitc.org.uk


Time Stamps


[0:00] Introduction. [1:10] If you could have coffee with anyone who would it be? [2:50] Simon Crowther is introduced. [3:17] Simon’s personal journey. [7:06] Simon’s company today. [8:00] Who’s at risk of flooding. [9:45] Stewart Steel is introduced. [10:03] What is Sedgwick? [11:10] Stewart’s personal journey. [12:20] How does preparing for disaster, combatting it and addressing it it all work? [13:25] How to be ready. [18:48] Stewart asks Simon about his next steps. [19:59] Simon asks Stewart about his journey from a “one man show” to a large organisation. [21:06] Personal resilience and being prepared. [23:17] Cross-organisational collaborations our guests would like to see. [26:40] Advice for your younger self. [29:50] Oli asks our guests how they might like to to collaborate more. [33:10] Final thoughts.


The Lens Podcast


The Lens is a Business in the Community podcast exploring responsible business in a digital age, powered by Fujitsu and supported by McCann. Business in the Community is The Prince’s Responsible Business Network. We exist to build healthy communities with successful businesses at their heart.


Don’t forget to follow The Lens on Instagram and to rate, review and subscribe on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. instagram.com/thelenspodcast

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12/12/2019

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Season 2, Ep. 12
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