The Future Car: A Siemens Podcast

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Part 2: How Virtual Reality is Making Mobility Accessible for Everyone with Sofia Lewandowski

Season 2, Ep. 25

As we continue to steer towards a more mobility-inclusive future, there’s a restructuring that needs to take place. This goes for our perceptions of what is possible in terms of automated transportation, and how we make sure that this technology wave is being executed in terms of production. You might say it’s a restructuring from the factory floor up. 


Artificial Intelligence is entering our workspace in subtle ways already, but the future is proving bright for AI in more direct operations too. It’s being used as a training tool for machine operators, and it’s providing valuable information that operators, designers, and managers can use to change how we do things, improving training access and efficiency along the way.


In this episode of the Women Driving the Future series, Ed Bernardon continues his conversation with  Sofia Lewandowski. As a Senior UX Researcher, IoT & Industry 4.0 at FactoryPal, her work happens directly on the factory floor where she can help shape both the design and assembly process. The virtual environment she’s created has paved the way for accessible mobility for the masses.  


In this follow-up episode, we’ll learn the different mindset around creating vehicles versus establishing the groundwork for building better, more accessible vehicles. She’ll share what she’s learned from working remotely during the pandemic, and how it may be shifting the future of how we work. You’ll also hear her perspective on women working in the software and automotive industries. 


Some Questions I Ask:

  • What kinds of machines are you working with on the factory floor? (1:51)
  • How is AI used in this application? (2:45)
  • What’s different about the goals working at HFM versus FactoryPal? (7:21)
  • How do you think people feel about artificial intelligence? (10:23)
  • How do you think the role of women compares in the automotive and software industries? (22:13)


What You’ll Learn in this Episode:

  • How FactoryPal is helping machine operators (0:44)
  • Training through experience versus AI  (4:51)
  • Where the fear around AI comes from (13:09)
  • How the pandemic has shaped the future of work (18:45)
  • How AV’s might help impatient drivers (24:38)


Connect With Sofia Lewandowski:

LinkedIn 


Connect with Ed Bernardon:

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