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The Conversation Weekly

Discovery: how celebrity footballers can help reduce prejudice against minorities

In the latest episode of Discovery, an ongoing series where we explore the stories behind new research discoveries from around the world, we hear about how a Muslim celebrity footballer helped reduce Islamophobia. In this episode, Salma Mousa, assistant professor of political science at Yale University in the US, explains how she found a "Mo Salah effect" and why she's now testing how durable it is.

This episode was produced and written by Gemma Ware, with sound design by Eloise Stevens. Our other producers are Mend Mariwany and Katie Flood. Our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. 

More episodes of our Discovery series will be published via The Conversation Weekly every couple of weeks. 


Further reading and listening:

How to depolarise deeply divided societies – podcast

Brazil’s iconic football shirt was a symbol of Bolsonaro – here’s how the World Cup is changing that


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