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The Ancients

Poverty Point: Centre of Ancient America

Ep. 312

An ancient, colossal site in Northeastern Louisiana, Poverty Point is a mystery amongst archaeologist and anthropologists a like. Dating back nearly 4 millennia, Poverty Point is renowned for it's massive earthworks, with gigantic concentric circles, complex mounds, and towering ridges - it's a site to behold. But who exactly built Poverty Point, and more importantly - why?


In this episode Tristan welcomes Poverty Point's Park Manager, Mark Brink, to the podcast to help decipher some of the mystery surrounding this Prehistoric site. Looking at the incredible earthworks, examining the recent archaeology, and delving in Prehistoric American society - what do we actually know about Poverty Point?


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