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Streets Ahead

The Plan for Drivers

Season 2, Ep. 15

In a special emergency episode, Ned and Adam try to make sense of the Plan for Drivers announcement. What does it mean for active travel and public transport? Will it actually change anything? What are the politics behind the announcement?


You can read the Low Traffic Neighbourhood review here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/low-traffic-neighbourhood-review


In the episode, Adam mentioned there wasn't reference to air quality on boundary roads. The report actually said the view is mixed: "LTNs have succeeded in improving air quality on internal roads but this benefit has not always been shared with boundary locations which show a mix of minimal reductions, no reductions and some increases in emissions of air pollutants."


The fourth location for the LTN review was Wigan, in addition to London, Birmingham and York.


By the way, if you want ad-free listening, behind-the-scenes and bonus content and to help support the podcast - head to (https://www.patreon.com/StreetsAheadPodcast). We’ll even send you some stickers! 


We’re also on Twitter and welcome your feedback on our episode: https://twitter.com/podstreetsahead


If you're reading this, please can you take 1 minute to give us a rating and write a review? It helps us more than you probably think.


Episode edited by Clare Mansell.

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