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Smart Creation Podcast

The podcast exploring the potential of sustainable fashion

Smart Creation, the podcast, invites you to explore the potential of sustainable fashion.With Smart Creation, discover the latest products and global initiatives from key upstream players to help make the move to a more
Latest Episode11/9/2022

#50 Matteo Ward, co-founder and CEO of WRÅD

"WRÅD is not a brand, it's our call to action" Today, Smart Creation invites Matteo Ward, co-founder and CEO of WRÅD, an innovative project dedicated to change in the fashion industry in all its forms (social, economic, environmental).From supply to manufacturing methods, including logistics and traceability, every thing in the fashion industry can be changed, redesigned, improved in order to reduce the impact of our clothes on the environment but also respect those who make them.Through education, innovation, design and consulting, the global crisis is not just a fatality, but an opportunity to change things.In this episode, Matteo Ward also gives us a highlight on the underside of the fashion industry and the different solutions he is implementing with WRAD to change it in depth.CONTENT TO FIND YOUR WAY IN THE EPISODE 0:58 : Matteo presents himself3:18 : How his time at Abercrombie & Fitch opened his eyes to the fashion industry.4:00 The Rana Plaza disaster.5:55 : His commitment after leaving Abercrombie & Fitch.17:50 : His work as a consultant for brands, companies and manufacturers.23:36 : Where are we going in term of sustainable fashion?28:20 : His actions with WRAD.32:50 : His biggest challenge for years to come.34:46 : Which fashion brands are going in the right direction?37:14 : What does he want to close the door to in our industry?37:39 : What does he look at to get inspired?38:35 : His book recommendations.39:41 : What is the last piece of clothes he bought? 40:18 : Who would he like to listen to in this podcast? KEY LEARNINGS "I’ve been working from seven years in this industry and nobody ever challenge me to know more about the product, where it came from, who made our clothes : all this things was new.""I really wanted to understand what was the truth behind the word sustainable fashion.""In 2015 nobody believed in what we were doing, nobody want to talk about sustainable fashion.""We don’t know how the world will look like in hundred years, but if we start thinking about it now, we gonna be prepared to future proof."ABOUT WRÅDWRÅD : https://www.wradliving.com/aboutTO SUPPORT SMART CREATION THE PODCASTDon’t forget to share and talk about the podcast to your friends and colleagues, it’s easy and it helps the podcast a lot, and please rate it 5 stars and leave us a comment on Apple Podcast. To know more about Smart Creation and Première Vision https://www.premierevision.com/fr/
11/9/2022

#50 Matteo Ward, co-founder and CEO of WRÅD

"WRÅD is not a brand, it's our call to action" Today, Smart Creation invites Matteo Ward, co-founder and CEO of WRÅD, an innovative project dedicated to change in the fashion industry in all its forms (social, economic, environmental).From supply to manufacturing methods, including logistics and traceability, every thing in the fashion industry can be changed, redesigned, improved in order to reduce the impact of our clothes on the environment but also respect those who make them.Through education, innovation, design and consulting, the global crisis is not just a fatality, but an opportunity to change things.In this episode, Matteo Ward also gives us a highlight on the underside of the fashion industry and the different solutions he is implementing with WRAD to change it in depth.CONTENT TO FIND YOUR WAY IN THE EPISODE 0:58 : Matteo presents himself3:18 : How his time at Abercrombie & Fitch opened his eyes to the fashion industry.4:00 The Rana Plaza disaster.5:55 : His commitment after leaving Abercrombie & Fitch.17:50 : His work as a consultant for brands, companies and manufacturers.23:36 : Where are we going in term of sustainable fashion?28:20 : His actions with WRAD.32:50 : His biggest challenge for years to come.34:46 : Which fashion brands are going in the right direction?37:14 : What does he want to close the door to in our industry?37:39 : What does he look at to get inspired?38:35 : His book recommendations.39:41 : What is the last piece of clothes he bought? 40:18 : Who would he like to listen to in this podcast? KEY LEARNINGS "I’ve been working from seven years in this industry and nobody ever challenge me to know more about the product, where it came from, who made our clothes : all this things was new.""I really wanted to understand what was the truth behind the word sustainable fashion.""In 2015 nobody believed in what we were doing, nobody want to talk about sustainable fashion.""We don’t know how the world will look like in hundred years, but if we start thinking about it now, we gonna be prepared to future proof."ABOUT WRÅDWRÅD : https://www.wradliving.com/aboutTO SUPPORT SMART CREATION THE PODCASTDon’t forget to share and talk about the podcast to your friends and colleagues, it’s easy and it helps the podcast a lot, and please rate it 5 stars and leave us a comment on Apple Podcast. To know more about Smart Creation and Première Vision https://www.premierevision.com/fr/
10/13/2022

#49 Shannon Mercer, Chief Executive Officer - FibreTrace® (Traceability technology)

Ep. 49
When it comes to purchasing, there’s no doubt that consumers want to understand what’s behind the product. This topic has made its way, and now finds great key players to act for real shifts. At FiberTrace®, Chief Executive Officer Shannon Mercer is acting for traceability all along the supply chain with thoughtful technology. Combining both physical and digital, the platform allows users to map products in real-time, ensuring the tracking of the fibers, from the field to the store. Offering different solutions using blockchain and certified verification, there’s no more reason for the industry to get slow on this revolution. In this quest of alignment with oneself, ones values and ethics, Shannon highlights that these shifts are made possible from all sides, pushed by legislation, industry players, services like FibreTrace tools but also, consumers. A tool that cannot be dismissed, when we know that they offer several services, some at zero cost. In this episode, Shannon gives an analytical eye on the market and consumer behaviors, and he also shares some case studies on how transparency can shape a business.CONTENT TO FIND YOUR WAY IN THE EPISODE 2:28 : Shannon presents himself3:10 : How did FibreTrace® start?4:04 : His definition of sustainable fashion4:45 : FibreTrace® activity4:15 : His definition of traceability7:54 : The importance of physical traceability8:50 : His definition of traceability and blockchain and their complementarity 10:45 : Is he involved in every step of the supply chain?12:10 : His customers12:45 : How has traceability evolved in the past years?13:35 : What is the legal framework?16:45 : What are the final clients expectations?19:05 : A case study at FibreTrace®20:21 : The technology’s cost21:40 : The future of traceability22:48 : How long does it take to apply this process?24:25 : Their challenges in the upcoming years26:09 : How can the fashion industry accelerate its revolution?26:25 : Is FibreTrace® exclusive to all parts of the supply chain?28:40:  The advice he would give to young designers regarding traceability30:00 What does he want to close the door to in our industry?30:15 : What does he look at to get inspired?30:32 : What is the last piece of clothes he bought? 30:45 : Who would he like to listen to in this podcast? KEY LEARNINGS “All brands can take full ownership of their supply chain and therefore the full impact on individual goods. We want to see a world where consumers can pick up a garment and know the impact it will have on the planet. I think that is where traceability starts.” “Each fiber has a different application and each fiber type has a unique signature.” “Ensuring you can connect physical traces to digital platforms is the only way of having a full transparent system.”“Consumers are very much more emotional in their purchasing decisions and this is why we see the demand for transparency from brands playing driven from the market when the changes are occurring.” Learn more about FibreTrace® :https://www.fibretrace.io 
9/10/2022

#48 Augustin Firino Martell, Fashion & Luxury Traceability and CSR Manager - Crystalchain (Traceability platform)

Ep. 48
The data era might have its perks to operate a sustainable transition, especially in the fashion and luxury industries. At the core of Crystalchain’s activity, information and technology are used in order to drive actions towards a more transparent system. Traceability and CSR manager of the company Augustin Firino Martell opens today’s talk on how to implement blockchain for traceable and transparent solutions. Collecting information from the field to the final product, he’s helping brands and all the actors of the industry to settle a trustworthy system with reliable sources. Criteria such as the environment, animal welfare, social criteria and supply chain are all taken into account to constitute a proof of sustainability for its product, and thus certify an ethical commitment. But this system won’t be possible without the supply chain actors. That is why Augustin is encouraging cooperation and strongly aims to onboard suppliers as changes also come when it’s done in a collective way.In this episode, Augustin explains how we can identify the issue we want to improve and monitor. We also speak about ESG laws and how governments are acting for this transition. CONTENT TO FIND YOUR WAY IN THE EPISODE 0:55 : Augustin presents himself1:10 : His background1:55 : His definition of sustainable fashion3:15 : Introduction of Crystalchain4:15 : His definition of traceability8:10 : About blockchain11:05 : The industries he is working with13:45 : Augustin gives an application case of his work20:20 : Going to the field21:20 : How long does it take to implement this collaboration system?23:20 : How much does it cost?23:55 : What are the market expectancies?16:55 : What’s their biggest challenge in the upcoming year?17:42 : How can the fashion industry accelerate its sustainable revolution?18:50 : What are the right indicators regarding certification?23:25 : How can the fashion industry accelerate its fashion revolution?26:25 : What are the upcoming regulations to come?29:15 : Which regulations are taking the lead?31:32 : About the second life of the product33:00 : What solutions for the second life of a product?35:30 : What will traceability look like in the future?37:10 : Their digital platform to follow up on traceability40:10 : What can the fashion industry do to accelerate its revolution?41:58:  What does he want to close the door to in our industry?43:10 : What does he look at to get inspired?44:40 : What is the last piece of clothes he bought? 45:35 : Who would he like to listen to in this podcast? KEY LEARNINGS “We see that more and more of the suppliers around the world have the same issues and they are also starting to have a way of providing the information to prove the origin of their materials.” “We like to go on the field to understand the process and to speak with the actors. One of the key issues is onboarding the actor and getting the actor to imply  people to build the system.” “You need cooperation with the actors if you want to be quickly successful.”“Traceability is the basis to be aligned with the regulations.”  Learn more about Crystalchain:https://crystalchain.io 
8/17/2022

#47 Blair Kanis, President of Cocona Labs - 37.5® technology (Bio-based Fibers Company)

As synthetic waste represents a big issue to the fashion industry, some suppliers seem to work toward new solutions for a more sustainable approach on the end of life of products.Blair Kanis, president of Cocona Labs presents in this episode the technology 37.5®, an innovative thermoregulator fabric that helps your body stay in its ideal temperature and ideal humidity level. Using active natural minerals, they incorporate it in the yarn at the very beginning of the production process. Composed of recycled polyester fibers, they gave a particular attention to the making of their product, in every step. At Cocona Labs, sustainable decisions are based on science and data especially on the end of life products outcomes. Indeed, as synthetic fibers products are not easy to recycle, they thought about using an additive in order to make the biodegradability more fluid and natural.Blair Kanis explains how she works hands in hands with brands, where quality and sustainability go along.CONTENT TO FIND YOUR WAY IN THE EPISODE 0:54 : Blair presents herself and her company1:23 : Her definition of sustainability2:00 : Introduction of her company3:03 : How does the technology 37.5® work?5:15 : How is it made?6:10 : The yarn structure7:20 : How do they deal with the textile waste issue?9:24 : How does the biodegradation process work?10:23 : How do they balance the synthetic end of life challenges with the performance and durability benefits of their product?11:55 : Their way of working with brands13:12 : What’s the future of her company?14:01 : How does she see the future of synthetic textile waste?16:55 : What’s their biggest challenge in the upcoming year?17:42 : How can the fashion industry accelerate its sustainable revolution?18:50 : What are the right indicators regarding certification?23:25 : How can the fashion industry accelerate its fashion revolution?21:22 :  What does she want to close the door to in our industry?21:51 : What does she look at to get inspired?22:05 : What is the last piece of clothes she bought? 23:27 : Who would she like to listen to in this podcast? KEY LEARNINGS  “We really want to help brands understand that by working with us, they don’t have to choose between quality and sustainability.” “We spent a lot of time studying the science of what happens in landfills. I think it’s important for brands and other industries to do the same because there’s a lot of components to understand the rate of degradation of textile and what actually happens to it.” “Using recycled synthetic materials is important at the beginning of the life cycle to reduce reliance on virgin petroleum based products.” “We are focused on sustainability both on the material side as well as looking at our company’s impacts and adjusting them.” Learn more about 37.5® technology:https://thirtysevenfive.com  TO SUPPORT SMART CREATION THE PODCAST Don’t forget to share and talk about the podcast to your friends and colleagues, it’s easy and it helps the podcast a lot, and please rate it 5 stars and leave us a comment on Apple Podcast. To know more about Smart Creation and Première Vision https://www.premierevision.com/fr/
7/7/2022

#46 Hao Ding, Business and Marketing Manager of Covation Biomaterials (Bio-based Fibers Company)

Ep. 46
What if fossil-based fabrics were not necessary anymore? Imagine the impact it would have on the planet. At Covation Biomaterials, business manager Hao Ding is acting to make this outcome happen. The company produces bio-based polymers. They’ve developed different products that cover the textile, cosmetic and home industries. Using natural resources like starch and plant-based solutions, the technologies are ticking every box of sustainability, without forgetting high performance and quality characteristics.If sustainability is at the core of the company’s strategy, it’s because Covation is aiming to engage a conversation with customers, brands, stakeholders and generally, every player related to the supply chain in order to propose an alternative to fossil-fueled polyester fabrics.In this episode, Hao explains the process, the goals of the company, and his willingness to contribute in a positive way to our industry. You will learn all about the sourcing of the raw materials and certifications.Sorona, Susterra and Zemea will sound familiar to you after listening to this podcast!CONTENT TO FIND YOUR WAY IN THE EPISODE 0:58 : Hao presents himself3:03 : What is his job?4:00 : Introduction of his company5:40 : What’s a biopolymer?8:08 : What's the impact of bio polymers?10:00 : What does sustainable fashion mean to him10:55 : Are all their products sustainable?11:20 : What’s his favorite product?12:12: Where do they source the raw materials?13:34 : Why did he dedicate his career to sustainability?15:00 : The core strategy of Covation biomaterial17:20 : What are the KPIs is he looking at?18:45 : The certifications they have20:30 : Their upcoming goals21:25 : The biggest challenges for the fashion industry23:25 : How can the fashion industry accelerate its fashion revolution?24:50 : What’s his advice to young designers?28:38 :  What does he want to close the door to in our industry?28:56 : What does he look at to get inspired?29:42 : What is the last piece of clothes he bought? 30:08 : Who would he like to listen to in this podcast? KEY LEARNINGS  “If we are able to convince the consumer to use more bio-based solutions, we can actually make a big impact regarding the carbon footprint.”“The plant stores the carbons in its body. We can turn these carbons into monomers or polymers meaning we don’t depend on the fossil based and we don’t bring extra carbons into the environment anymore. At that point, it is very sustainable.” “We are committed to continuously improving in terms of social and environmental impact.” “Try to have a holistic view before you make any decision. Think through each step of the supply chain, and also try to think a bit deeper: what could be the impact?” Learn more about Covation Biomaterials:https://covationbio.com   TO SUPPORT SMART CREATION THE PODCAST Don’t forget to share and talk about the podcast to your friends and colleagues, it’s easy and it helps the podcast a lot, and please rate it 5 stars and leave us a comment on Apple Podcast. To know more about Smart Creation and Première Vision https://www.premierevision.com/fr/
6/1/2022

#45 Sylvia Happel, Head of Business Development Europe at Lenzing (Sustainable Fibers Company)

At the essence of our clothes, fibers are the first step towards a sustainable production.Following the government’s request, Lenzing group has developed for many years fibers made from natural wood in order to reduce water consumption and involve renewable energies. You may already know one of them. Such as Viscose, different fibers have come out using the same process based on cellulosic fibers. Sylvia Happel, Head of Business Development in the Europe market at Lenzing believes in the idea that what comes from nature, is by definition something that can go back to it. She explores the great potential of those promising fibers through the lens of innovative technologies, business and market wise as well as circularity stakes. The Austrian company with an international outreach has lately set up new challenges, such as extending circularity to the post-consumer waste use.In this episode, Sylvia shares all the perks of cellulosic fibers, giving their properties and the certifications that follow. Far from greenwashing, and truly dedicated to what producing consciously means, Lenzing also shows a great example of what political decisions can involve in the fashion industry.CONTENT TO FIND YOUR WAY IN THE EPISODE 0:57 : Sylvia presents herself and the company4:15 : What does sustainable mean to her?6:20 : The certifications they use7:58 : Are all their products sustainable?9:05 : What's the difference between those fibers?12:13 : Her favorite fiber12:58 : What makes Lenzing stand out from the others?14:34 : Why did they invest that early in sustainability?16:15: How can the fashion industry accelerate its transition?17:40 : How can we avoid greenwashing?20:20 : The cost of sustainable fibers21:18 : What’s her advice regarding sustainable fibers?22:30 : What are the KPI’s she’s looking at?23:40 : The future of their company26:13 : Is she optimistic regarding the times we are living in?27:42 : How to convince customers to buy sustainable clothes?30:20 : What does she want to close the door to in our industry?30:28 : What does she look at to get inspired?31:28 : What is the last piece of clothes she bought? 31:45: Who would she like to listen to in this podcast? KEY LEARNINGS  «Circularity is very important, it means for our fibers that they come from nature and they go back to nature. All our fibers are compostable.» «People working at Lenzing believe in what they are doing, they do what they are saying, they are trustful.» «Most people are not doing greenwashing on purpose, it’s just a lack of knowledge.» «Post-consumer waste can be anything, any blend and dyed stuff with different finishes. Our goal is to reach 50% post-consumer waste.» Learn more about Lenzing  Lenzing: https://www.lenzing.com   TO SUPPORT SMART CREATION THE PODCAST Don’t forget to share and talk about the podcast to your friends and colleagues, it’s easy and it helps the podcast a lot, and please rate it 5 stars and leave us a comment on Apple Podcast. To know more about Smart Creation and Première Vision https://www.premierevision.com/fr/
5/2/2022

#44 Ifeanyi Okwuadi, Founder of his eponymous brand (Menswear Fashion Designer)

Like many of his fellows who had a successful career in the fashion industry, Ifeanyi Okwuadi also did his class at Savile Row. The 28 year old fashion designer based in London indeed learned and understood how to make a garment, and by definition, an impeccable one. If quality is his main focus, it’s certainly for him a way to create a piece that sustains through time. He envisioned his collection through the artisanal gesture and that’s probably what made him stand out of the 36th Hyères Fashion Festival. Winner of the Great Prize in 2021, the menswear designer took into account everything that makes sense to him such as sourcing the right fabrics, using great craftsmanship, but also by including his remarkable tailor skills.In today’s Smart Creation episode, we talked with Ifeanyi about locality, ambition and sustainability from a design perspective.CONTENT TO FIND YOUR WAY IN THE EPISODE 0:55 : Ifeanyi presents himself3:10 : His definition to sustainable fashion4:15: What was his project for the Hyères Festival?7:50 : What was the main question regarding sustainability in his project?9:40 : What’s its starting creative point ?10:55 : What did he learn in terms of sustainability?12:50 : What makes a good garment13:45 : What did he learn at Margaret Howell ?15:25: How can we bring back this idea that a good garment costs money?18:45 : Where does he want to bring his project ?20:15 : What will be his most important criteria as a member of the Hyères jury?21:45 : How can the fashion industry accelerate its revolution?22:55 : What does he advise to young designers?24:16 : What does he want to close the door to in our industry?24:35 : What does he look at to get inspired?24:50 : What is the last piece of clothes he bought? 25:05: Who would he like to listen to in this podcast? KEY LEARNINGS  «It’s really important for me to promote what we have, specifically in Britain like the craftsmanship, the skills and the labourers.» «In a quality garment you can see the tailor's construction work, the needlework or everything that is involved in the making.» «It’s all about the quality of the garment.» «You can learn from the past, but don’t take away the bits that have gone wrong or failed and work on those things.» About Ifeanyi Okwuadi & other references Ifeanyi Okwuadi: http://ifeanyiokwuadi.com @ifeanyiokwuadi: https://www.instagram.com/ifeanyiokwuadi/ 36th edition of Hyères Fashion Festival: https://villanoailles.com/festivals/36e-festival-international-de-mode-de-photographie-et-daccessoires-de-mode-hyeres  Margaret Howell: http://margarethowell.fr  Fashion Revolution: https://www.fashionrevolution.org