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Revenue Accelerator with Audrey Holst

Season 2021, Ep. 826

Many of you don't recognize that perfectionism is part of your Achilles heel, or if not, the entirety of what it is that's preventing you from achieving more success. In this episode of the Revenue Accelerator Podcast, our guest is Audrey Holst. Audrey helps people recognize what perfectionism is, what it looks like, and the things associated with it—thoughts, feelings, fears, and behavior. So people can start to understand and track these behaviors in themselves. Stay tuned to learn more!

Perfectionism

[1:03]

Perfectionism is a survival mechanism that we've started with and just continued with because it seemed to work for us. But at a certain point, it becomes a hindrance and not a help. 

Imposter Syndrome

[7:34]

Imposter syndrome and people-pleasing are hugely related to perfectionism. It also depends on people's unique archetypes. There are different ways that people relate to their perfectionism and different ways that they show up. 

Perfectionism Archetypes

[9:06]

The five archetypes are the:

  1. Brake and gas perfectionist. The person who feels like they've got their foot on the gas and brake simultaneously. They're going nowhere, but it feels like they’re racing fast. 
  2. Optics Perfectionist. People who patronizes aesthetics. Everything looks wonderful on the outside, but the inside is on fire.
  3. Hero perfectionist. The person who is always jumping in and saving everybody else and over-functioning but is not handling their own stuff. 
  4. Covert perfectionist. People who are close to you may not even realize that you're a perfectionist, which you struggle with. 
  5. Rigid perfectionist. They often show up in business, especially in certain leaders who use control and power to influence nicely.

Red flags that could be costing you money in your business

[15:37]

Avoiding conversations that need to be had—avoiding telling the truth to yourself and others. Spending way too much time on stupid tasks that don't need your time. Not taking risks. If you're constantly putting the blame to others, it might be because you don't want to take responsibility yourself. Not only you are not managing yourself, you also don’t manage your time and energy well. Finally, things associated with avoidance type behaviors, procrastination type behaviors, or defensiveness are some of the red flags.

How perfectionism play into other areas of your life

[20:32]

Success in your business may look a certain way. But what does success in your relationships look like? What does success in your overall life look like? What is success in your downtime? It's important to make those decisions to see how those decisions impact you as a human being, your mental health, physical health, and relational health, and get clear about that.


Learn more about Audrey Holst:

Website: https://fortitudeandflow.com/ 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fortitudeandflow/?hl=en

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FortitudeandFlow/ 

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/audrey-holst 


Visit The Revenue Accelerator Podcast’s website at:

https://actionincubator.com/

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