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I Could Lose Everything After 'Devastating' End to 8-Year Court Battle Over Same-Sex Wedding, Florist Says

When the Supreme Court announced July 2 that it had declined to take up florist Barronelle Stutzman’s case, it left her on the losing side of an eight-year court battle. 

In 2013, one of Stutzman’s longtime customers asked her to design floral arrangements for his same-sex wedding. She told him that because of her religious beliefs, she could not design an arrangement for the wedding, but she referred him to several other florists. A few weeks later, she learned she was being sued. 

The Washington state "attorney general, without any complaint from Rob [Ingersoll] and Curt [Freed] sued me personally and corporately, and the ACLU got ahold of Rob and Curt and also sued me personally and corporately," Stutzman told The Daily Signal.

Now, the Washington state Supreme Court ruling against the Christian florist stands because the U.S. Supreme Court declined to take up Stutzman’s appeal. The Supreme Court’s move could cost Stutzman everything. 

"It has cost us so much mentally, physically, spiritually," Stutzman said. "And then the cost, everything we've worked for all these years, the flower shop that I own, our home, our retirement, our life savings, everything is in jeopardy because of the ACLU, [and] attorney fees are going to be so large."

Stutzman and Kristen Waggoner, general counsel for Alliance Defending Freedom, join the “Problematic Women” podcast to explain the details of the court battle and the implications of the high court’s refusal to hear her appeal. 

Also on today’s show, we talk with Lindsey Burke, director of The Heritage Foundation’s Center for Education Policy, about the National Education Association’s commitment to promote critical race theory in schools across America. 

And as always, we’ll be crowning our “Problematic Woman of the Week.”

Enjoy the show!

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9/2/2021

Future for Afghan Women, Donda Drops, and Football Is Back

America’s longest war is over. But the chaotic end to the war in Afghanistan has many Americans questioning the leadership of the Biden administration.It’s estimated that there are still between 100 and 200 Americans and thousands of our Afghan partners trapped in the Taliban-controlled south-central Asian nation. While the Taliban claim they will respect the rights of women and girls, experts say the terrorist group hasn’t given Afghans any reason to believe them.“It seems that the women will be those who will be losing the most, whether it is because of conflict or the authoritarian regime that is oppressive toward women,” says Roya Rahmani, the female former Afghan ambassador to the United States.On Tuesday, Rahmani and Heela Najibullah, author of “Reconciliation and Social Healing in Afghanistan,” joined The Heritage Foundation for an event, “Grim Prospects for Women and Girls in Afghanistan.” We share their remarks on the podcast today.Also on the show, we mark the start of the college and NFL football season by talking about the big games to watch this week. And Kanye West finally releases "Donda,” his new album. We break down some of the controversy over the album's release, and how the record highlights West’s artistic talent.And as always, we will crown our “Problematic Women of the Week.”Plus, “Problematic Women” announces a new show format. In addition to the Thursday show, which will now be solely discussion-based, “Problematic Women” will release an exclusiveinterview every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month.Enjoy the show!