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Principle of Charity

Oscar Special: Spotlight with Jane Campion - On Creativity

Season 1, Ep. 32

Spotlight with Jane Campion: can creativity help us leap outside ourselves?


Multiple academy award winning writer and director Jane Campion (The Piano The Power of the Dog) joins Emile and Lloyd for a fascinating conversation on creativity and how it can change and enhance our understanding of each other.  Jane explains her creative practices and in particular her use of dream therapy to tap into the subconscious and write characters like Phil Burbank, the protagonist in The Power of the Dog, her 2022 Academy Award-winning film.


Emile and Jane have worked closely together on television series and films. Emile, an Academy Award winning producer (The King’s Speech) describes creativity as an extraordinary movement towards the lives of others. “It’s an incredibly powerful muscle that forces you outside of yourself and into the most generous version of other experiences, as you can’t create rich and believable characters unless you know them from the inside out.  

“I was excited to get on someone on the podcast who can talk to us in a deep way about creativity, and what it might offer for better understanding points of view we disagree with.  And by far the best person I could think of is Jane.”


Guest:  Jane Campion

Jane Campion was born in New Zealand and  has directed many feature films including THE PIANO, for which she won the Palme D’Or at Cannes, becoming the first woman to receive this award.  The film was nominated for 9 Academy Awards, including nominations for Campion for Best Director  & Best Original Screenplay, the latter of which she won.

Her most recent film, THE POWER OF THE DOG (2022) received 12 Academy Award nominations including for Best Director which Jane won. The film also won Best Film at the BAFTA.  

Her other films include AN ANGEL AT MY TABLE which won 7 prizes at the 47th Venice Film Festival, including the Silver Lion; THE PORTRAIT OF A LADY which closed the 53rd Venice Film Festival and won the Francesco Pasinetti Award; and HOLY SMOKE which was nominated for the Golden Lion at the 56th Venice Film Festival and won the Elvira Notari Prize.  

The two season limited-series TOP OF THE LAKE which Campion created, co-wrote, executive produced and directed 5 of the 12 episodes, received 8 Emmy Award nominations and premiered at Sundance, Berlin and Cannes Film Festivals.

Jane was President of the Jury at 54th  Venice Film Festival and returned in 2008 as a Jury Member.



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You can be part of the discussion @PofCharity on Twitter, @PrincipleofCharity on Facebook and @PrincipleofCharityPodcast on Instagram.

 

Your hosts are Lloyd Vogelman and Emile Sherman.

 

Find Lloyd @LloydVogelman on Linked in

 

Find Emile @EmileSherman on Linked In and Twitter.

 

This Podcast is Produced by Jonah Primo and Bronwen Reid

 

Find Jonah at jonahprimo.com or @JonahPrimo on Instagram 


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