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Parliament Matters

Another Rwanda roadblock

Season 1, Ep. 27

The Lords have dug in their heels and inflicted seven defeats on the Government over the Rwanda Bill this week. The Government claims the Bill is emergency legislation but it will not go back to the House of Commons until after the Easter recess. We discuss why, and what will happen next.


Senior Conservative backbencher William Wragg MP tells us why he has lost confidence in the Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle MP, and why he has therefore resigned from the Speaker’s Committee on the Electoral Commission. As Chair of the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Select Committee, he also discusses the Committee’s work scrutinising the centre of government and tells us what advice he would give to new MPs at the start of the next Parliament.


And we explore why a spanner has been thrown into the local election works in the West Midlands after the Home Office failed to keep track of its statutory obligations under the Government’s new Levelling Up and Regeneration Act. Consequently, a judge this week quashed a decision by the Home Secretary to transfer the functions of the Police and Crime Commissioner for the West Midlands to the Mayor. With the local elections just weeks away it’s thrown the electoral process into some chaos: will a vote for a Police and Crime Commissioner be back on the ballot on 2 May?


It’s a cautionary tale of legislative confusion, flawed Whitehall communications, and the problems that can arise when public consultation is so rushed it is deemed insincere and when the Government insists on pushing through its agenda without heeding genuine concerns raised by Parliament.



Support the Hansard Society by making a donation. We don't have a wealthy founder or an endowment. That's why donations are so important – they help to support our work AND our independence: hansardsociety.org.uk/donate


Parliament Matters is a Hansard Society production supported by the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust


Producer: Richard Townsend


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