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Paleo Bites

Carbonemys, the Coal Turtle

Ep. 174

(image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonemys)


Host Matthew Donald and guest co-host Natasha Krech discuss Carbonemys, an enormous super predator that gives Raphael a run for his money in terms of turtle aggression and edginess. From the Early Paleocene, this 10-foot turtle chomped on crocodiles and fought giant snakes such as Titanoboa, which is freaking wild. A fitting start to the Age of Mammals; not with mammals, but with giant monstrous reptiles. Sort of like how the Age of Dinosaurs started with the synapsid stem mammals ruling the Earth first. Everything is backwards.


Want to further support the show? Sign up to our Patreon for exclusive bonus content at Patreon.com/MatthewDonald. Also, you can purchase Matthew Donald's dinosaur book "Megazoic" on Amazon by clicking here, its sequel "Megazoic: The Primeval Power" by clicking here, its third installment "Megazoic: The Hunted Ones" by clicking here, or its final installment "Megazoic: An Era's End" by clicking here, as well as his non-dinosaur-related book "Teslanauts" by clicking here.

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