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cover art for Shardlake and its Creator C.J. Sansom

Not Just the Tudors

Shardlake and its Creator C.J. Sansom

Ep. 321

Fans of historical fiction and crime novels have been saddened to learn of the recent death of the award-winning, best-selling author C.J. Sansom, just days before the release of Shardlake - the TV series based on his Tudor barrister detective novels.


In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb pays tribute to a fine author, and a fine fictional creation with the writer and journalist Antonia Senior. 


This episode was edited by Ella Blaxill produced by Rob Weinberg.


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