Neil Oliver's Love Letter to the British Isles

Share

76 Ireland’s Teardrop, Fastnet Rock

Season 1, Ep. 76

In this episode we set sail with Neil, past Fasnet Rock, fleeing the horror of famine.

 

The Vikings called it Hvasstann-ey, ‘the island shaped like a sharp tooth’, the Irish knew it first as Carraig Aonair, ‘the Lonely Rock’, then as Fastnet, ‘Ireland’s Teardrop’.


A treacherous island, little more than a jagged rock, it has been responsible for countless shipwrecks and deaths at sea. It was the last part of Ireland many emigrants saw as they sailed to North America to escape the Great Hunger and many a teardrop was shed over it.


A rock wreathed in sadness and tears, standing as a fitting memorial to lives lost at sea and the lives driven off to be lived elsewhere.

 

To help support this podcast sign up to Neil Oliver on Patreon

https://www.patreon.com/neiloliver

New Videos Every Week

 

Instagram account – Neil Oliver Love Letter 

https://www.instagram.com/neiloliverloveletter/?hl=en

 

Neil Oliver YouTube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnVR-SdKxQeTvXtUSPFCL7g

More Episodes

1/11/2022

86 Remembering the Dead, The Cenotaph

Season 1, Ep. 86
In this episode we are walking down Whitehall, one of London’s most famous streets, to remember the dead of the First World War.Fabian Ware joined the British army at the outbreak of the war, but because he was 45 years old, the authorities would let him fight on the front line and put him in charge of a mobile ambulance unit instead.Appalled by the number of casualties and troubled that the dead were not being recorded properly he began keeping note. On account of his efforts, the organization now called the Commonwealth War Graves Commission came into existence. The process of remembrance began.11 November 1919 was the first anniversary of the war’s end. It was marked with the construction of a temporary memorial called the Cenotaph on Whitehall, a march of remembrance and the return of the Unknown Soldier. The outpouring of emotion at this event and the public’s actions demanded that the temporary Cenotaph be made permanent. And across the whole of the British Isles collective grief propelled the largest public art project ever seen as communities took it upon themselves to build their own local memorials to remember all the dead.To help support the making of this podcast sign up to Neil Oliver on Patreonhttps://www.patreon.com/neiloliverHistory & CommentNew Videos Every WeekInstagram account – Neil Oliver Love Letterhttps://www.instagram.com/neiloliverloveletter/?hl=enNeil Oliver YouTube Channelhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnVR-SdKxQeTvXtUSPFCL7g