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MAGI Reviews

Are you telling the truth about Freemasonry?


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  • 14. Who are "Famous" Freemasons?

    15:30
    Freemasons in general don't define what a "Famous Freemason" is, what makes a Freemason "famous," or whether or not these so called Famous Freemasons consider themselves to be famous or whether that title has been 'forced' upon them (wanted or not). In this episode MAGI discusses definitions of the word 'famous' and how they might be applied to Freemasons. Certainly an interesting Masonic topic, and quite different from a book review!

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  • 13. Colonial Freemasonry

    12:35
    MAGI reviews Wes Cook's Colonial Freemasonry, published in 1974. This book claims to answer questions like: what is the oldest Masonic Lodge in North America? What is the difference, if any, between Ancient and Modern lodges in America? Why do Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Georgia all make claims to important Masonic history? It is popular history, with more than 13 contributors all reciting the history of Freemasonry in their state, and published by the Missouri Lodge of Research.
  • 12. Freemasonry: The Study of a Phenomenon

    18:36
    MAGI Reviews Alexander Piatgorsky's Freemasonry: The Study of a Phenomenon, originally titled Who’s Afraid of Freemasonry? First published in 1997, and reprinted in 1999 by Harvill Press, London. This substantial book of 398 pages is divided into four parts: Introduction, History, Ritual and Mythology, and a Conclusion. Although this is a history of Freemasonry, Piatgorsky’s approaches the subject from two angles: philosophy and the Craft a cultural phenomenon, not an institution.
  • 11. Revolutionary Brotherhood: Freemasonry and the Transformation of the American Social Order

    15:57
    MAGI Reviews Steven C. Bullock’s Revolutionary Brotherhood: Freemasonry and the Transformation of the American Social Order, 1730-1840 published in 1996 by the University of North Carolina Press. After nearly 30 years it remains the standard work on early American Freemasonry, arguing not only that the Craft first introduced -- and then transformed -- the eighteenth-century Enlightenment in America, but that it later helped to create the nineteenth-century culture of democracy, individualism, and sentimentalism.
  • 10. The Tutankhamun Prophecies: The Sacred Secret of Maya, Egyptians, and Freemasons

    15:42
    MAGI Reviews Maurice Cotterell’s The Tutankhamun Prophecies: The Sacred Secret of Maya, Egyptians, and Freemasons. It was first published in 1999, and reprinted in 2001 by Baron Company of Rochester, Vermont. We attempt to understand the author’s claim that there were links between the Maya, Egyptians and Freemasons, but more especially to learn more about what he calls "the Freemasons’ Sacred Secrets."
  • 9. Why Write About the Past?

    15:24
    In this episode, the MAGI discuss how, and why, writing about the past in a serious and critical manner is important. Most especially, how does the reader assess the quality of what they are reading? Who is the author, and what qualifications do they possess?
  • 8. Secret Architecture of our Nation’s Capital: The Masons and the Building of Washington, DC

    12:52
    MAGI Reviews David Ovason’s Secret Architecture of our Nation’s Capital: The Masons and the Building of Washington, DC published in 1989 by Harper Collins. This book is a popular history that argues that "the mythology of stellar lights played an essential part in the foundation and history of the federal city. The deeper meaning of the zodiacal symbols which radiates through Washington DC is so subtle that it has remained hidden even today."