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The LRB Podcast

Four Hundred Years of Women's Football

Emma John and Natasha Chahal join Tom to discuss England’s victory in Euro 2022, the long history of women’s football – mentioned in a poem by Philip Sidney in the 16th century, banned by the FA for half of the 20th – and what may happen next.

Find further reading, and listen ad free, on the episode page: https://lrb.me/euro22pod

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Title music by Kieran Brunt / Produced by Anthony Wilks

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