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Hi, I'm Dan, your English teacher online and ANGLOPOD is a podcast and a website for improving your English. Just choose what you want to practise, listen to the lessons and do the quizzes at ANGLOPOD.COM to help you lea
Latest Episode8/15/2022

Past in negatives and questions

Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to continue looking at English tenses. In particular, we’re going to learn how to use the past simple tense in questions and negative statements.Here’s an example. “I SPEAK English now, but I DIDN’T SPEAK English last year”. The first half of the sentence is present simple. This is true now. “I SPEAK English”. The second half of the sentence is past simple. “I DIDN’T SPEAK English last year.”Notice how we make the negative statement in the past. The main verb SPEAK doesn’t change! We don’t say “I didn’t spoke”. We say “I DIDN’T SPEAK”. That’s because the auxiliary verb DO expresses the past. DO becomes DID NOT or DIDN’T. So we don’t need to change the main verb.This can be verb confusing for many students, because this rule does not exist in many other languages, so it is a very common mistake to make when using English tenses. Just remember, when using the auxiliary verb DO to make the past simple, so DID or DIDN’T, don’t change the main verb as well. Leave it as a bare infinitive, in this example, SPEAK.The rule is the same when we make questions. In the present tense, we say “DO you SPEAK English?” but in the past tense we say “DID you SPEAK English?” not “DID you SPOKE?” Again, the auxiliary verb DO expresses the past tense, so we don’t change the tense of the main verb.DID you PRACTISE your English yesterday? DO you PRACTISE your English every day? You should! So go to ANGLOPOD.COM so you can! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:https://anglopod.com/ebook/
8/15/2022

Past in negatives and questions

Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to continue looking at English tenses. In particular, we’re going to learn how to use the past simple tense in questions and negative statements.Here’s an example. “I SPEAK English now, but I DIDN’T SPEAK English last year”. The first half of the sentence is present simple. This is true now. “I SPEAK English”. The second half of the sentence is past simple. “I DIDN’T SPEAK English last year.”Notice how we make the negative statement in the past. The main verb SPEAK doesn’t change! We don’t say “I didn’t spoke”. We say “I DIDN’T SPEAK”. That’s because the auxiliary verb DO expresses the past. DO becomes DID NOT or DIDN’T. So we don’t need to change the main verb.This can be verb confusing for many students, because this rule does not exist in many other languages, so it is a very common mistake to make when using English tenses. Just remember, when using the auxiliary verb DO to make the past simple, so DID or DIDN’T, don’t change the main verb as well. Leave it as a bare infinitive, in this example, SPEAK.The rule is the same when we make questions. In the present tense, we say “DO you SPEAK English?” but in the past tense we say “DID you SPEAK English?” not “DID you SPOKE?” Again, the auxiliary verb DO expresses the past tense, so we don’t change the tense of the main verb.DID you PRACTISE your English yesterday? DO you PRACTISE your English every day? You should! So go to ANGLOPOD.COM so you can! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:https://anglopod.com/ebook/
8/8/2022

Present with adverbs of frequency

Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to look at how we use the present tense, both simple and continuous, with adverbs of frequency in English. This will help us understand English tenses better.Let’s start with an example to see what we mean. “I ALWAYS DO my homework”. The adverb of frequency here is ALWAYS and it comes before the verb DO, which is in the present simple form. So, we NORMALLY PUT adverbs of frequency before the verb in English. That’s another example right there! NORMALLY PUT. So, you could say “I ALWAYS DO”, “I SOMETIMES DO”, “I RARELY DO” or “I NEVER DO”, for example. That’s an easy rule to remember.However, if the verb is BE then the adverb of frequency goes after, like this: “I AM ALWAYS a good student”. So, BE followed by the adverb of frequency. “I AM SOMETIMES a good student”, “I AM RARELY a good student”, “I AM NEVER a good student”.However, we also use the adverb of frequency ALWAYS with the present continuous, but it has a specific meaning. For example, you can say: “I AM ALWAYS FORGETTING my homework”. This means it is a repeated action I do and I wish I didn’t! It sounds like a bad habit. Something you regret and would like to change about your personality. You could also say: “I AM ALWAYS BITING my nails” or “I AM ALWAYS LOSING my phone”.Also, we can use the adverb of frequency NEVER with the present continuous and this too has a specific meaning. For example, you can say: “I AM NEVER DOING that again” or “I AM NEVER GOING there again”. We use NEVER with present continuous here to express frustration and dislike of something. Something that you did once but never want to repeat!If you ARE ALWAYS a good student, then I’m sure you NEVER FORGET to go to ANGLOPOD.COM to practise your English! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:https://anglopod.com/ebook/
8/1/2022

Verbs that are never continuous

Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to continue to learn about English tenses by taking a look at verbs in English that are never, or hardly ever, used in the continuous form.In the previous lesson, we learnt about the difference between the present simple and continuous tense and how the meaning can change when the form of the verb changes. However, there are some verbs that we just don’t use in the continuous form. For example, you say: “I LIKE these shoes”. You don’t say: “I AM LIKING these shoes”. That just sounds very strange.These verbs normally refer to how we feel, what we like and what we believe. Here are a few more examples. You would say: “I LIKE these shoes. They FIT me really well. But I KNOW I can’t afford them because they COST too much!” All these verbs are in the present simple. They would sound very strange in the continuous form, so you couldn’t say ‘liking’, ‘fitting’, ‘knowing’ and ‘costing’ here.Even though it might be possible to use these verbs in the present continuous in your language, it is not possible in English. Remember, verbs that refer to the way we feel, such as LIKE and LOVE, are normally just present simple. Also, verbs that describe belief, like BELIEVE or KNOW, and the senses, like SEE or HEAR, are normally just present simple.It is sometimes possible to use the continuous form for some of these verbs, but it changes the meaning. If you say: “I think I AM SEEING things” for example, it means ‘imagining something that’s not real’. If you say: “I AM SEEING someone”, it means ‘dating’.Do you LIKE learning English? I KNOW you do! So go to ANGLOPOD.COM to learn more! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:https://anglopod.com/ebook/
7/25/2022

Present simple and continuous

Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to learn about English tenses and in particular the difference between the simple and continuous form of the present tense. When do we use present simple and when do we use present continuous? Let’s find out more…We normally use the present simple in English to talk about things that usually happen or things that are generally true, so it’s useful to talk about habits or repeated actions. For example, “I HAVE eggs for breakfast every day”. So we don’t say: “I AM HAVING eggs every day”. That sounds strange.We use the present continuous to talk about a temporary situation, an action that is happening right now. So you could say: “I AM HAVING breakfast”. This means you are eating now, you are busy, you can’t do anything else. This action is in progress now.You could emphasise that by saying “I AM HAVING breakfast at the moment” or “I AM HAVING breakfast right now”, but it should be clear if you just use the present continuous on its own.So going from present simple to continuous normally changes the meaning of what we want to say. For example, if you say: “I LIVE in London”, this means London is your permanent home. However, if you say: “I AM LIVING in London”, this suggests that the situation is temporary and you will probably move or return home soon.You could develop that sentence by saying “I AM LIVING in London at the moment, but I LIVE in Paris”. London is your temporary home and Paris is your permanent home.So, you ARE LEARNING English right now of course, but DO you LEARN English every day? Go to ANGLOPOD.COM to make learning about English tenses your daily habit, a true and repeated action! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:https://anglopod.com/ebook/
7/18/2022

USED TO and WOULD

Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to look at the difference between USED TO and WOULD in English. You might think these two words are very different but actually we use them both to talk about past habits. Let’s learn more…So, in the last lesson, we learnt that we use USED TO to talk about past habits. “I USED TO PLAY football” or “I USED TO GO swimming”. But there is another way to talk about past habits. You could use the modal verb WOULD.For example, “When I was a child, I WOULD PLAY football” or “I WOULD GO swimming”. It’s another great way to talk about your past habits. “When I was a student, I WOULD GET UP late, I WOULD GO to lots of parties, I WOULD have too much homework!”However, there is one main difference. We can use USED TO to talk about actions and states in the past, but we can only use WOULD to talk about actions in the past. So we can say “I USED TO PLAY football” or “I WOULD PLAY football” because they’re both actions, but you can’t use WOULD for a state. You could say “I USED TO BE shorter” but not “I WOULD BE shorter”, because the verb ‘be’ refers to a state, not an action.One final rule. When you write USED TO in a negative sentence or a question, you write USE TO (without ‘d’), so “I USED TO PLAY football”, “I DIDN’T USE TO PLAY football” and “DID you USE TO PLAY football?” But the good news is that the pronunciation is exactly the same. You can’t hear the difference. It always sounds like USED TO.So, I USED TO PLAY football a lot at school. I WOULD PLAY lots of different sports. How about you? Go to ANGLOPOD.COM and tell us about all the repeated actions in your past, the actions you did as a habit, but you don’t do now. See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:https://anglopod.com/ebook/
7/11/2022

USED TO DO and USED TO DOING

Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to learn the difference between USED TO DO and USED TO DOING in English. The first one is used for talking about past habits but the second one is quite different. We use it to talk about things we are accustomed to. Let’s learn more…Firstly, we use USED TO to talk about things we did again and again in the past but we don’t do now. So these are repeated habits. Think about things you did every day when you were a child. For example, “I USED TO PLAY football”. This is something I did every day at school. Unfortunately, I don’t have the time now, but I USED TO PLAY football”.But what does it mean if you say I AM USED TO PLAYING? I’M USED TO PLAYING? You could say “I’M USED TO PLAYING football”. The meaning here is very different. It means that playing football was strange or not normal for you at the beginning, but after lots of practice it now feels normal. You have improved, you like it. You ARE USED TO DOING it. You are accustomed to it.Here’s another example. “I’M USED TO SPEAKING English now”. This means that at the beginning it was strange or difficult for you, but now after lots of practice you feel more comfortable and it is much easier or normal for you.ARE you USED TO SPEAKING English now? Does it feel more normal for you now? Go to ANGLOPOD.COM and tell us in the comments. Also, you can tell us about your past habits with USED TO as well. For example, “I USED TO be bad at English but now I’m much better”! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:https://anglopod.com/ebook/
7/4/2022

WOULD YOU LIKE and DO YOU LIKE

Improve your English today at ANGLOPOD.COM. Hi everyone, I’m Dan and today we’re going to learn about the difference between using WOULD YOU LIKE and DO YOU LIKE. We use WOULD YOU LIKE to make offers or suggestions, but we use DO YOU LIKE to ask someone their opinion about something. Let’s find out more…Firstly, you could use WOULD YOU LIKE with a noun, so “WOULD YOU LIKE a glass of wine?” You’re making a specific offer here. You’re offering a glass of wine. However, you could also use DO YOU LIKE with a noun, like this: “DO YOU LIKE wine?” But in this case, you’re asking for an opinion. What does this person think about wine in general? You could say “DO YOU LIKE wine?” and then say “WOULD YOU LIKE some wine?” or “WOULD YOU LIKE a glass of wine?” but DO YOU LIKE and WOULD YOU LIKE have different purposes.You can also use WOULD YOU LIKE and DO YOU LIKE with a verb, but the structure is different. You could make a suggestion or invite someone by saying: “WOULD YOU LIKE to go dancing tonight?” or “WOULD YOU LIKE to dance with me?” This is a specific suggestion or invitation, so the verb after WOULD YOU LIKE is infinitive, ‘to dance’ or ‘to go dancing’.However, you could ask for a general opinion about dancing: “DO YOU LIKE dancing?” You’re asking if that person enjoys the activity of dancing, so in this case DO YOU LIKE is followed by the gerund form of the verb, meaning the -ing form. A gerund is just a noun made from a verb.So, I have a couple of questions for you. DO YOU LIKE learning English? WOULD YOU LIKE to learn more English? Then go to ANGLOPOD.COM and answer those questions in the comments! See you soon!Get the FREE eBook:https://anglopod.com/ebook/