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cover art for 683: Alan Ereira, part 3: More about Kogi life and culture, contrasting with ours

This Sustainable Life

683: Alan Ereira, part 3: More about Kogi life and culture, contrasting with ours

Ep. 683

The more I move toward living sustainably, the more I learn about cultures that haven't become as polluting, depleting, addicted, and imperialist as ours. I grew up thinking they were stuck in the Stone Age, but they aren't.

Conversations with Alan help me learn about the Kogi, with whom he's lived in the mountains of Colombia and made two documentaries with the BBC. The relevant differences is that compared to us, they live sustainably, free, and in abundance.

Alan shares more in our third conversation about what he's learned from them, including how they see us, which is sobering.

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