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cover art for 040: Which is easier, freeing slaves or not using disposable bottles?

This Sustainable Life

040: Which is easier, freeing slaves or not using disposable bottles?

Ep. 40

Which is easier, for a slave owner to free his or her slaves or for you to stop using disposable water bottles and food packaging, flying around the world, turning down the thermostat and wearing a sweater in the winter, and so on?


If you had slaves, would you free them?


I think most people would say it's a lot easier to avoid plastic than to free slaves, but they would also say they would free their slaves -- at least when no one can check. But they don't act environmentally.


If you believe you would make the difficult choices hypothetically, will you also make the easier choices here and now?

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